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I have funcion, which is called very frequently. This function has two nested for loops inside. Each of the for loops iterates from 0 to 900. The code looks like this:

 for (int j = 0; j < width; j++)
            {
                for (int k = 0; k < height; k++)
                {
                    switch (Dim2[j * width + k])
                    {
                        case 0:
                            cwA = Dim0[j * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            ccwA = Dim0[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + k];
                            oppA = Dim0[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            cwB = Dim3[j * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            ccwB = Dim3[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + k];
                            oppB = Dim3[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            break;

                        case 1:
                            cwA = Dim0[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + k];
                            ccwA = Dim0[j * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            oppA = Dim0[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            cwB = Dim3[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + k];
                            ccwB = Dim3[j * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            oppB = Dim3[((j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)) * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            break;

                        case 2:
                            cwA = Dim0[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + k];
                            ccwA = Dim0[j * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            oppA = Dim0[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            cwB = Dim3[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + k];
                            ccwB = Dim3[j * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            oppB = Dim3[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + ((k == (height - 1)) ? 0 : (k + 1))];
                            break;

                        case 3:
                            cwA = Dim0[j * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            ccwA = Dim0[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + k];
                            oppA = Dim0[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            cwB = Dim3[j * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            ccwB = Dim3[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + k];
                            oppB = Dim3[((j == 0) ? (width - 1) : (j - 1)) * width + ((k == 0) ? (height - 1) : (k - 1))];
                            break;
                    }
                    woll = (((oppB + ccwB) + cwB) + Dim3[j * width + k]) > 0;
                    collision = ((Dim0[j * width + k] == oppA) && (cwA == ccwA)) && (Dim0[j * width + k] != cwA);
                    Dim6[j * width + k] = (short)(3 - Dim2[j * width + k]);
                    if (woll || collision)
                    {
                        Dim4[j * width + k] = Dim0[j * width + k];
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Dim4[j * width + k] = _phase ? cwA : ccwA;
                    }
                }
            }

it takes around 0.1 second to execute these for loops, which is too slow. I've replaced two-dimentional arrays with 1 dimentional, this significantly improved performance. Are there any other performance improvements for the code? Will it work faster if I migrate it to c++? Should I use any other language for arrays manipulation? What would you suggest?
Thanks in advance,
Sam

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Maybe also try to explain what you like to accomplish. There might be standard libraries (e.g. OpenCV) that are highly optimised to do your task –  RobAu May 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Maybe pretty obvious but: Turn on optimizations and switch to release, and see if it is fast enough. –  dowhilefor May 21 '12 at 16:07
    
Did you try this in a Release build or just a Debug build? –  skarmats May 21 '12 at 16:07
    
Also, make sure you traverse the arrays according to their layout in memory. So try to enumerate columns first, then rows. I can see how this is might be difficult to extract, though ;) –  skarmats May 21 '12 at 16:11
    
@skarmats: .net optimization is turned on, changing configuration to Release makes no difference (execution time is the same). –  Semen Shekhovtsov May 21 '12 at 17:41
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7 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Refactor things like height - 1, j + 1, width - 1, j * width into variables so they're only calculated once. It will help a little. In fact, you could add to this list:

(j == (width - 1)) ? 0 : (j + 1)
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+1 and maybe get rid of the tenary operations or at least calculate them once. –  dowhilefor May 21 '12 at 16:00
    
@dowhilefor - indeed, added one of them in an edit already, but there is quite a list... –  David M May 21 '12 at 16:01
    
He should calculate them outside the loops. –  Mihai Todor May 21 '12 at 16:01
    
Well, except the ones that are based on loop variables. So the ternary condition I've mentioned should be calculated inside the outer loop but outside the inner one; things like height - 1 outside both, absolutely. –  David M May 21 '12 at 16:02
    
also maybe an ifelse is faster than a switch, but that is just a guess related to a long long time optimization session back on an old arm cpu. Maybe compilers these days are smart enough. –  dowhilefor May 21 '12 at 16:02
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Will it work faster if I migrate it to c++?

If by C++ native is referred, It should.
Why
1. Garbage collector is not there
2. Memory realignment is not there
3. CLR is not there

However optimization may be there in managed code by CLR, equivalent native code should be faster. That is the precise reason most of the BCL CPU intensive logic is in native code(decorated by MethodImplOptions.InternalCall).

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I have found that you can get speeds very close to native C++ in this type of code by using C#'s unsafe contexts. –  Groky May 21 '12 at 16:05
    
That is right. Reason to use unsafe, and reason to use native are same. Both serves same purpose. When I see snippet of code has performance concern, i got unsafe way. If snippet it pretty large, i prefer C++ native library, and P/Invoke –  Tilak May 21 '12 at 16:11
    
Yep, I have to try unsafe code with pointers usage, thx guys. –  Semen Shekhovtsov May 21 '12 at 17:04
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Can you use unsafe contexts in this project? You should be able to significantly improve performance by using pointers rather than indexing the array as each time you read from the array you will no longer incur .Net's array bounds checking etc.

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Then he's better of using C++ instead... –  Mihai Todor May 21 '12 at 16:00
    
Not necessarily: if the majority of the project is in C# then you get the best of both worlds, i.e. everything can be written in the same language without managed to unmanaged transitions, and you can still use fast pointer arithmetic. –  Groky May 21 '12 at 16:02
    
OK, agreed, but anyway, it's nasty. –  Mihai Todor May 21 '12 at 16:07
    
@MihaiTodor: not at all! Unsafe is there for a reason in C# and it's exactly for this sort of thing. You still retain C#'s garbage collection etc etc but bypass .Net's array bounds checking. –  Groky May 21 '12 at 16:10
1  
@MihaiTodor: Yes, fair enough! Though if he were to move to C++ he'd still have those problems, plus a whole bunch of other potential problems on top :) –  Groky May 21 '12 at 16:21
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I'm not a C# expert, but I would try to put all calculations that are 'static' and inside your loop (your inline conditionals, and multiplications) outside the loop.

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If you need a significant speedup, maybe you should consider using multiple threads, at least for the outer loop. Also, make sure that you are not using overflow checks.

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multithreading is not applicable in this case, as far as all operations inside outer loop depend on the result of the inner loop. –  Semen Shekhovtsov May 21 '12 at 17:09
    
It's kind of hard to see that, given the above code :) You're probably mixing the indexes all over the place... –  Mihai Todor May 21 '12 at 17:38
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Another solution, especially for modern computers with multiple cores might be to change the outer for loop into a call to Parallel.For.

You should make the other optimizations suggested here first, though.

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How can outer loop be runned in parallel? Parallel execution is not possible, because inner loop uses iterator from the outer loop. –  Semen Shekhovtsov May 21 '12 at 17:17
    
Simply put, each iteration of the outer loop can run independently. The inner loop will still have access to the outer loop's state. At least that appears to be the case as far as I can see from your code. –  Groky May 21 '12 at 17:40
    
@Groky: I think the issue with this approach is that Dim4 and Dim6 need to be computed sequentially, but I'm also having a hard time figuring out what's going on, given that code. –  Mihai Todor May 21 '12 at 17:45
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You can remove j == 0 and j == (width - 1) test completely by having 3 copies of the inner loop. You can do the same thing with k, if you peel the first and last iterations off of the loop. Of course if you do both you'd have 9 copies of the inner code, which isn't really nice, and I wouldn't particularly recommend that - removing the conditionals depending on k should have a bigger effect, and/because you can move the conditionals depending on j to outside the inner loop anyway.

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