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I've come across something in C++/CLI that goes against what I thought I knew:

Usually, if you pass an object into a function, you'd use a dot to access its methods (this also works for ref classes, with some extra constructors):

value class Value {
  void Print() { Console::WriteLine("Value"); }
};

void f(Value v) {
  v.Print();
}

Also usually, passing an object via an interface into a function forces you to put a ^ on the argument, and use -> in the method call:

interface class Base {
  void Print();
};

void f(Base ^b) {
  b->Print();
}

However, if you make f generic, with a constraint based on an interface, the compiler insists that you use ->, but also insists you don't use ^ in the arguments list:

interface class Base {
  void Print();
};

generic <class T> where T : Base
void f(T t) {
  t->Print();
}

Up to now, I believed that referencing objects directly always uses . and referencing them through their handles always uses ->. This appears to reference an object directly using a -> - what am I getting wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

They tried to make the C++/CLI syntax equivalent to C++ syntax but that wasn't particularly successful. The rule is that you use . to access a member of a value type, -> to a access a member of a reference type.

Complication number one is stack semantics. You can drop the hat to declare a local variable of a reference type. Which then automatically gets disposed at the end of the scope block, the compiler automatically generates a destructor call. An attempt to make managed types behave similar to C++ types and rescue the RAII pattern.

Complication number two is that the compiler permits using the hat on a variable of a value type. Which is 99% of the type a mistake, particularly nasty because that's very expensive at runtime since the value gets boxed.

Generics made it ultimately ambiguous, the type parameter can be either a value type or a reference type. Which will make the concrete type either a value or a reference type, that isn't sorted out until runtime. Note that this is permitted in your example, a value type may implement an interface. The rule then is that you always write the code without hats on the variables of the type parameter, treating them as through they are value types. But dereference those variables as though they were reference type references, using the arrow. Yes, very confusing.

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The rule is that you use . to access a member of a value type, -> to a access a member of a reference type. But if you declare a local reference type variable (as you say, by dropping the hat), you'd access it through a .. This all seems rather arbitrary. –  Philip C May 22 '12 at 7:15
1  
I expressly mentioned that in the answer, stack semantics. Works that way in C++ too so not completely arbitrary. –  Hans Passant May 22 '12 at 7:20
    
So a reference type, used in this way, gives a value type object? Presumably because the ^ is the reference? –  Philip C May 22 '12 at 7:24
1  
No, that's not possible. It gives it value type behavior. Deterministic destruction in particular. That's a big deal in C++ so C++/CLI tries to emulate it. –  Hans Passant May 22 '12 at 7:28
    
So: The rule is that you use . to access a member of objects exhibiting value type behaviour, and -> to access a member of objects exhibiting reference type behaviour? (Without quibbling too much over the semantics of the word object with regards to static members, etc.) –  Philip C May 22 '12 at 7:31

Up to now, I believed that referencing objects directly always uses . and referencing them through their handles always uses ->. This appears to reference an object directly using a -> - what am I getting wrong?

Your first sentence is completely right. For your second sentence.... you aren't accessing an object directly. T itself will be a handle type, such as String^.

Your idea of using extra copy-ish constructors to have stack semantics on parameters of reference type is fighting against the language design. I recommend you stop that. If you really want to use the . operator, you can try managed references: void f(RefType% p), which should also work for interfaces: void f2(Base% p). But cloning and disposing reference types isn't going to turn out well, doing anything useful with those types depends on you working on the original object and not a copy.

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I would just say that I only tried the copy constructor thing to see if the same thing happened for ref as for value while trying to figure out what was going on - it's not a part of any actual program I'm writing :P If you derive a value class from Base, and pass it into the generic function, it'll still use the -> syntax. I suppose the language just can't be consistent given all the contradictory things it needs to be able to do... –  Philip C May 24 '12 at 7:11

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