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How I can convert in bash a string in hex (for example "d43c23F1") to binary.

Without using the utility bc.

Hex:Binary

d43c23F1:11010100001111000010001111110001

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Is this a homework question? What have you tried yourself? –  Dennis Williamson May 21 '12 at 19:52

4 Answers 4

Every hex digit corresponds to exactly four binary digits. Make a dictionary of those mappings and loop over every hex character, appending the four digits to the answer. I'm not posting code since I haven't that much time, but you should be able to proceed from here.

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Can you use dc instead? Then you can do:

$ echo 16 i 2 o D43C23F1 p | dc
11010100001111000010001111110001

Otherwise, you could follow Emil's suggestion using bash "associative arrays". There is a Linux Journal article that talks about them in some detail. Create a dictionary that maps hex digits to their binary representation:

declare -A bits
bits[A]=1010

Split your hex string into digits, then look each one up in the array.

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Thanks, but dc also can not use. –  KarlsD May 21 '12 at 16:57
    
Hopefully the rest of the answer points you in the right direction. –  larsks May 21 '12 at 17:00

Shamelessly, stolen from here, with modifications for hex.

#!/bin/bash
# SCRIPT:  hex2binary.sh
# USAGE:   hex2binary.sh Hex_Number(s)
# PURPOSE: Hex to Binary Conversion. Takes input as command line
#          arguments.
#                        \\\\ ////
#                       \\  - -  //
#                           @ @
#                   ---oOOo-( )-oOOo---
#
#####################################################################
#                      Script Starts Here                           #
#####################################################################

if [ $# -eq 0 ]
then
    echo "Argument(s) not supplied "
    echo "Usage: hex2binary.sh hex_number(s)"
else
echo -e "\033[1mHEX                 \t\t BINARY\033[0m"

    while [ $# -ne 0 ]
    do
         DecNum=`printf "%d" $1`
         Binary=
         Number=$DecNum

         while [ $DecNum -ne 0 ]
         do
              Bit=$(expr $DecNum % 2)
              Binary=$Bit$Binary
              DecNum=$(expr $DecNum / 2)
         done

         echo -e "$Number              \t\t $Binary"
         shift
# Shifts command line arguments one step.Now $1 holds second argument
        unset Binary
   done

fi

You must start your hex number with 0x for this to work.

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this code assumes your hex is in caps (necessary for other bases that may use capital and lower case) - just add the functions to your bashrc

toupper() { #change input $@ to upper case
uppers=ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
lowers=abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
i=0
while ([ $i -lt ${#1} ]) do
    CUR=${1:$i:1}
    case $lowers in
        *$CUR*)CUR=${lowers%$CUR*};OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}${uppers:${#CUR}:1}";;
        *)OUTPUT="${OUTPUT}$CUR";;
    esac
    i=$((i+1))
done
printf "${OUTPUT}"
}

baseN2dec(){ #usage: baseN2dec number <base> (default base is 16)
#note base32 and base64 should really have a different string pattern ... todo
#RFC 4648 Base32 alphabet ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ234567 we use base32hex
#Base 64 is ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/
STRING=0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz+/
i=$((${#1}-1));DEC=0;POS=1;BASE=${2:-16}
while ([ $i -ge 0 ]) do
    VAL=${1:$i:1}
    VAL=${STRING%${VAL}*}
    VAL=${#VAL}
    DEC=$(($VAL*$POS+$DEC))
    POS=$(($BASE*$POS))
    i=$(($i-1))
done
echo $DEC
}

dec2baseN(){ #usage: dec2baseN number <base>
A=$(($1/$2))
STRING=0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz+/
[ $A -ge $2 ] && dec2baseN ${A} $2 || printf ${STRING:$A:1}
printf ${STRING:$(($1%$2)):1}
}

dec2bin(){
dec2baseN $1 2
}

dec2hex(){
dec2baseN $1 16
}
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