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Here are my ActiveRecord models, with Rails 3.2 :

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_one :criterion
    has_many :user_offer_choices
end

class Offer < ActiveRecord::Base
    has_many :user_offer_choices

    def seen
        user_offer_choices.where(seen: true)
    end

    def accepted
        user_offer_choices.where(accepted: true)
    end
end

class Criterion < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user
end

class UserOfferChoice < ActiveRecord::Base
    belongs_to :user
    belongs_to :offer
end

I want to get all the criterions of the users who have seen an offer. Something like :

Offer.find(11).seen.users.criterions

but I do not know how to to it with ActiveRecord

I know I can do something like :

Criterion.joins(user: { user_offer_choices: :offer }).where(user: { user_offer_choices: {accepted: true, offer_id: 11}  } )

But I want to be able to use my scopes on offers (seen & accepted). So how can I do it ?

Edit : I have found what I was looking for, the merge method of Arel : http://benhoskin.gs/2012/07/04/arel-merge-a-hidden-gem

share|improve this question

First, what you really want is define a scope on your choices.

class UserOfferChoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :offer

  scope :seen, where(seen: true)
  scope :accepted, where(accepted: true)
end

Which allows you to do this

Offer.find(11).user_offer_choices.seen

and to get the criteria:

Offer.find(1).user_offer_choices.seen.map{|choice| choice.user}.map{|user| user.criterion}

Now, this could be cleaned up with a has many through in the Offer class.

class Offer < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :user_offer_choices
  has_many :users, :through => :user_offer_choices
end

but that gets us to the user, but skipping the scope.

Offer.find(1).users

Now, there's a trick you can do with Rails 3 scopes which you could not do with Rails 2.3.5 named_scopes. The named_scopes took a hash as arguments but returned a relation. The Rails 3 scopes take a relation, as from query methods like where. So you can define a scope in users, using the scope defined in your choices class!

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_one :criterion
  has_many :user_offer_choices
  has_many :offers, :through => :user_offer_choices

  scope :seen, UserOfferChoice.seen
  scope :accepted, UserOfferChoice.accepted
end

That allows us to do this:

Offer.find(1).users.seen

The map now looks like this:

Offer.find(1).users.seen.map{|user| user.criterion}

BTW, the plural of criterion is criteria. Hearing criterions in my head when I read it, hurts. You can do this to get Rails to know the plural:

config/initializers/inflections.rb
ActiveSupport::Inflector.inflections do |inflect|
  inflect.plural /^criterion$/i, 'criteria'
end
share|improve this answer
    
I do not want to use map (or other Enum method), because it's plain Ruby and ActiveRecord won't generate SQL. – El_Picador May 22 '12 at 7:25
    
Why is it important to use SQL instead of map? That seems to me to be an arbitrary contrived requirement. If you notice, I demonstrated how to go from nesting two map calls, (which is cumbersome and hard to read) to a solution which gets rid of one map and uses SQL and your scopes. You might try extending that technique, but I think then that solution will be cumbersome. (More about map vs SQL in next comment.) – Marlin Pierce May 22 '12 at 10:24
    
Using map does have a downside that it loops through the collection, but then makes a call to the database in the loop to dereference the association. When I changed the choice map to the has-many-through it made one SQL call for the given Offer object, and built the join for us. However, I wouldn't worry about performance until we determined that the whole web response took too long. – Marlin Pierce May 22 '12 at 10:25
1  
I agree with you. But why use a map on the collection, when it is dead simple to get all the objects with only one (simple) SQL statement ? – El_Picador May 22 '12 at 11:46
    
I agree. When SQL can get the right results, it can be more efficient to just get the results. I post a lot of SQL centric answers, where I show the SQL which gets the right results and then translate them into query methods (or find arguments). The thing is, I have done a lot of work on this, (because I wanted to show off calling a scope from another class), starting with code that did not get the right result, and did not define scopes in a way that showed you looked up scopes. I think you could do some effort taking it the rest of the way. (Look at other answers of mine.) – Marlin Pierce May 22 '12 at 13:42

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