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The project I'm working on has hard coded URLs in the CSS file like this:

a.edit
{
    background: url(/TestSite/Images/Edit.png) no-repeat top left;
    display: inline-block;
    width: 16px;
    height: 16px;
    padding:1px;
    margin:1px;
    text-indent: -9999px; /* hides the link text */
}

When the site is moved to production, these links break. I'm looking for a solution so it just works where ever the site is run.

This is what I came up with and it works but I'm wondering if there is a better way:

<script>
    $(document).ready(function () {
        $("a.edit").css('background', 'url(' + $("body").data("baseurl") + 'Images/Edit.png) no-repeat top left');
    });
</script>
<body data-baseurl="~/">...</body>
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Great question! –  Brian Warshaw May 21 '12 at 17:02
1  
Why not work with relative urls? –  Rick Kuipers May 21 '12 at 17:04
    
What is the URL structure of the pages themselves? If the pages are under /TestSite/ then I don't see why you would include this in the css URL –  matt b May 21 '12 at 17:04
    
@BrianWarshaw, care to elaborate why you consider this to be a great question? –  walther May 21 '12 at 17:07
1  
@walther Because I, like the OP, didn't realize that the paths in a CSS file were relative to the CSS file--I assumed that they were relative to the html source referencing the css file. –  Brian Warshaw May 21 '12 at 17:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

CSS handles relative URLS relative to where the stylesheet is located. Take advantage of that and don't rewrite URLs in javascript.

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Bingo. I tried relative paths but I didn't realize it was relative to the CSS file. Thanks for the help –  tzerb May 21 '12 at 17:10

Use on production and development server the same folder structure. And use relative paths

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Good answer but unfortunately it’s not under my control. It is a corporate environment and both sides would squak if I tried to change either. –  tzerb May 21 '12 at 17:13
    
@tzerb I don't know about it. But you can try to use relative paths relatively to base meta tag. and display different base to production and development server –  Vladimir Starkov May 21 '12 at 17:19

Don't really understand what's the problem you're facing. Use relative paths instead of absolute and you will be fine no matter the hosting provider...

Btw, one more thing to consider - what if the client turns off javascript? ;)

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How about a relative URL?

a.edit
{
    background: url(Images/Edit.png) no-repeat top left;
    ...
}
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