Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know how to read bytes (x.read(number_of_bytes)), but how can I read bits in Python?

I have to read only 5 bits (not 8 bits[1 byte]) from a binary file

Any Idea or approach?

share|improve this question
1  
Are those bits consecutive? If so, the five most significant bits, or five least significant bits in the byte? –  Mike Pennington May 21 '12 at 17:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Python can only read a byte at a time. You'd need to read in a full byte, then just extract the value you want from that byte, e.g.

b = x.read(1)
firstfivebits = b >> 3

Or if you wanted the 5 least significant bits, rather than the 5 most significant bits:

b = x.read(1)
lastfivebits = b & 0b11111

Some other useful bit manipulation info can be found here: http://wiki.python.org/moin/BitManipulation

share|improve this answer
1  
when my reputations grows to 15, I'll give you thumbs up! (I'm new here) so, if I do this: b = x.read(1) firstfivebits = b >> 3 I'll get the first 5 bits... why not firstfivebits = b >> 5? y mean... why b >> 3? –  Hugo Medina May 21 '12 at 17:40
7  
@HugoMedina if you don't know why firstfivebits = b >> 3 you sure you should be fiddlin' with bits? (You might go blind or something ;). –  John Gaines Jr. May 21 '12 at 17:52
    
now I get it, since 1 byte = 8 bits we'll apply right-shift operator 3 (like deleting those 3 least significant bits) so we'll get the remaining 5 bits in the byte –  Hugo Medina May 21 '12 at 19:18

As the accepted answer states, standard Python I/O can only read and write byte(s) at a time. However you can simulate such a stream of bits using this recipe for Bitwise I/O.

Update:

Since the Rosetta Code website's GNU license allows verbatim copying, here's the Python version of bit-stream I/O in its entirety:

class BitWriter:
    def __init__(self, f):
        self.accumulator = 0
        self.bcount = 0
        self.out = f

    def __del__(self):
        self.flush()

    def writebit(self, bit):
        if self.bcount == 8 :
            self.flush()
        if bit > 0:
            self.accumulator |= (1 << (7-self.bcount))
        self.bcount += 1

    def writebits(self, bits, n):
        while n > 0:
            self.writebit( bits & (1 << (n-1)) )
            n -= 1

    def flush(self):
        self.out.write(chr(self.accumulator))
        self.accumulator = 0
        self.bcount = 0


class BitReader:
    def __init__(self, f):
        self.input = f
        self.accumulator = 0
        self.bcount = 0
        self.read = 0

    def readbit(self):
        if self.bcount == 0 :
            a = self.input.read(1)
            if ( len(a) > 0 ):
                self.accumulator = ord(a)
            self.bcount = 8
            self.read = len(a)
        rv = ( self.accumulator & ( 1 << (self.bcount-1) ) ) >> (self.bcount-1)
        self.bcount -= 1
        return rv

    def readbits(self, n):
        v = 0
        while n > 0:
            v = (v << 1) | self.readbit()
            n -= 1
        return v

Usage example to "crunch" an 8-bit byte ASCII stream discarding the most significative "unused" bit...

#! /usr/bin/env python
import sys
import bitio

o = bitio.BitWriter(sys.stdout)
c = sys.stdin.read(1)
while len(c) > 0:
    o.writebits(ord(c), 7)
    c = sys.stdin.read(1)

... and to "decrunch" the same stream:

#! /usr/bin/env python
import sys
import bitio

r = bitio.BitReader(sys.stdin)
while True:
    x = r.readbits(7)
    if ( r.read == 0 ):
        break
    sys.stdout.write(chr(x))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.