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After reading this article I decided to take a closer look at the way I was using Dapper.

I ran this code on an empty database

var members = new List<Member>();
for (int i = 0; i < 50000; i++)
{
    members.Add(new Member()
    {
        Username = i.toString(),
        IsActive = true
    });
}

using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members);

    scope.Complete();
}

it took about 20 seconds. That's 2500 inserts/second. Not bad, but not great either considering the blog was achieving 45k inserts/second. Is there a more efficient way to do this in Dapper?

Also, as a side note, running this code through the Visual Studio debugger took over 3 minutes! I figured the debugger would slow it down a little, but I was really surprised to see that much.

UPDATE

So this

using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members);

    scope.Complete();
}

and this

    connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members);

both took 20 seconds.

But this took 4 seconds!

SqlTransaction trans = connection.BeginTransaction();

connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members, transaction: trans);

trans.Commit();
share|improve this question
1  
Have you tried a DbTransaction (SqlTransaction)? That is a bit less overhead. Also, just for numbers: maybe try it without a transaction too, so we know what we are measuring. Finally, what does the 20s span? The inserts? The inserts+complete? Everything? Something else? –  Marc Gravell May 21 '12 at 20:29
    
20s is just the part encompassed by the using statement. I'll try the SqlTransaction –  kenwarner May 21 '12 at 20:32
    
The different transaction type can't shave off more that a few milliseconds. It is a one-time cost, not proportional to the number of items. –  usr May 21 '12 at 20:40
    
@usr all I'm saying is: it would be nice to be able to say thaT based on having the numbers –  Marc Gravell May 21 '12 at 20:41
1  
@MarcGravell note, even SqlTransaction has some additional overhead over "begin tran" –  Sam Saffron May 23 '12 at 12:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The best I was able to achieve was 50k records in 4 seconds using this approach

SqlTransaction trans = connection.BeginTransaction();

connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members, transaction: trans);

trans.Commit();
share|improve this answer
1  
maybe the connection isnt enlisted in transaction and you got the problem before? –  Parhs Oct 23 '12 at 13:35
    
i tried your code an i had 100% improvement. 10 sec from 20 –  Parhs Oct 23 '12 at 14:00

I stumbled accross this recently and noticed that the TransactionScope is created after the connection is opened (I assume this since Dappers Execute doesn't open the connection, unlike Query). According to the answer Q4 here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/2886326/455904 that will not result in the connection to be handled by the TransactionScope. My workmate did some quick tests, and opening the connection outside the TransactionScope drastically decreased performance.

So changing to the following should work:

// Assuming the connection isn't already open
using (var scope = new TransactionScope())
{
    connection.Open();
    connection.Execute(@"
insert Member(Username, IsActive)
values(@Username, @IsActive)", members);

    scope.Complete();
}
share|improve this answer

the fastest variant for me:

con.Execute(string.Format(@"insert into Member(Username, IsActive)
{0}", string.Join(" union all ", members.Select(x => string.Format("select '{0}','{1}'", x.Username, x.IsActive)))));

which generate sql like:

INSERT TABLENAME (Column1,Column2,...)
 SELECT 'Column1Row1Value','Column2Row1Value'...
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 'Column1Row2value','Column2Row2Value'...
 UNION ALL
 SELECT 'Column1Row3value','Column2Row3Value'...

this query works faster because sql adds set of rows instead adding 1 row at a time. The bottleneck is not writing the data, it's writing what you're doing in the log.

Also, look into the rules of minimally logged transactions.

share|improve this answer
1  
Little Bobby Tables says hi –  m0sa May 19 at 14:24

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