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I have a table containing many rows. Some of these rows are class="highlight" and signify a row that needs to be styled differently and highlighted. What I'm trying to do is add some extra spacing before and after these rows so they appear slightly separated from the other rows.

I thought I could get this done with margin-top:10px;margin-bottom:10px; but it's not working. Anyone knows how to get this done, or if it could be done? Here's the HTML and I've set the 2nd tr in the tbody to class highlight.

<table>
<thead>
  <tr>
     <th>Header 1</th>
     <th>Header 2</th>
  </tr>
</thead>
<tbody>
  <tr>
     <td>Value1</td>
     <td>Value2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr class="highlight">
     <td>Value1</td>
     <td>Value2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
     <td>Value1</td>
     <td>Value2</td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
     <td>Value1</td>
     <td>Value2</td>
  </tr>
</tbody>
</table>
share|improve this question
    
    
try this: tr.highlight td { position: relative; background-color: #EEEEEE; padding: 5px 0 5px 0; } – Sajmon May 21 '12 at 18:19
    
if you are using the separated box model, I obtained the effect you wanted playing with borders of cell elements (TD and TH), not TR like @Jrd suggested: tr.highlight td { border-top: 10px solid; border-bottom: 10px solid; border-color: transparent; } – Enrico M. Aug 7 '15 at 9:18

11 Answers 11

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Table rows cannot have margin values. Can you increase the padding? That would work. Otherwise you could insert a <tr class="spacer"></tr> before and after the class="highlighted" rows.

share|improve this answer
3  
Adding any kind of padding to <tr> doesn't move anything unless you specify display: block, at which point the width of the <tr> is based on content. Adding your suggested spacer <tr> with a set height works perfectly, though. – baacke Jan 22 '14 at 19:08
    
To be more precise, <tr> cannot have margin values since CSS 2.1 but it could until CSS 2. I have never found the reason behind the change. – Futal Jun 4 '14 at 16:10
    
Yes, unfortunately tr can't have margin values, like Steve wrote. I set margin value to each td like replacement for this. :( padding isn't solution, by my opinion, especially if rows are different colors (background) and You need some, let say, empty (white) space. – nelek Jul 16 '15 at 19:28

You can't style the <tr>s themselves, but you can give the <td>s inside the "highlight" <tr>s a style, like this

tr.highlight td {padding-top: 10px; padding-bottom:10px}
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3  
This will only visually work if the td background-color is the same as the tr. – baacke Jan 22 '14 at 19:10
    
great solution fixed my problem instantly – user975033 Dec 8 '15 at 3:38

I know this is kind of old, but I just got something along the same lines to work. Couldn't you do this?

tr.highlight {
    border-top: 10px solid;
    border-bottom: 10px solid;
    border-color: transparent;
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
thanks, but had to move properties on the TD elements to have it work: tr.highlight td { border-top: 10px solid; border-bottom: 10px solid; border-color: transparent; } – Enrico M. Aug 7 '15 at 9:21

line-height can be the possible solution

tr
{
    line-height:30px;
}
share|improve this answer

The border-spacing property will work for this particular case.

Reference.

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I would strongly suggest you take a look at your analytics and see how many IE7 or less users you have visiting the site. I've found I'm now able to drop support for IE7, and that means I can use CSS tables... which will make things a lot easier to work with.

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2  
OK, I'll bite. Why are things with CSS table styles easier to work with than real tables? What is, for instance, the easier alternative to the colspan and rowspan attributes? – Mr Lister May 21 '12 at 19:23
    
Colspan and rowspan, depending on how you're using them, are something that's likely easier with HTML tables. That said, you can get greater control over the layout using CSS. You're already running into an issue where HTML tables aren't working as you would expect them. In CSS, it's a bit easier. – user1337 May 22 '12 at 15:46
1  
-1: If you are using tables for showing tabular data, you are doing so totally correctly. Table is the only semantically correct way to do that. You just should avoid tables if you are misusing them for layouting-reasons (which the OP did not mention). – Gundon Mar 15 '15 at 18:52
    
CSS tables do everything HTML tables can do, and some more. For example, CSS tables can be responsive. They can also completely reflow the data based on a class, allowing for simple implementation of multiple views of the same data. Examples css-tricks.com/responsive-data-tables CSS tables are also semantically correct. I'm not sure why you would say they're not. – user1337 Mar 17 '15 at 15:24
    
What you linked to are pretty normal HTML tables with some additional CSS rules. Thats exactly what I was talking about. CSS does not change the DOM and since the data is present structured in the DOM, its sematicaly correct. When you spoke of CSS-Tables I assumed you were speaking of data which is made to look like a table via CSS but not really inside table-objects.. As table is a HTML-Tag, I have no idea why you would call that a CSS-Table otherwise.. – Gundon Mar 26 '15 at 18:38

You might try to use CSS transforms for indenting a whole tr:

tr.indent {
   -webkit-transform: translate(20px,0);
   -moz-transform: translate(20px,0);
}

I think this is a valid solution. Seems to work fine in Firefox 16, Chrome 23 and Safari 6 on my OSX.

share|improve this answer

Here's a neat way I did it:

table tr {
    border-bottom: 4px solid;
}

That will add 4px of vertical spacing between each row. And if you wanted to not get that border on the last child:

table tr:last-child {
    border-bottom: 0;
}

Reminder that CSS3 pseudo-selectors will only work in IE 8 and below with selectivizr.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the real way to do it. Simple and very un-annoying. Came to the same conclusion myself. You missed one thing, just give the border a transparent color... border-bottom: 10px solid transparent – mangonights Feb 26 at 2:25

add this style before the class="highlighted" padding-bottom and display is inline-table

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add a div to the cells that you would like to add some extra spacing:

<tr class="highlight">
 <td><div>Value1</div></td>
 <td><div>Value2</div></td>
</tr>
tr.highlight td div {
margin-top: 10px;
}
share|improve this answer

Another possibility is to use a pseudo selector :after or :before

tr.highlight td:last-child:after
{
  content: "\0a0";
  line-height: 3em;
}

That might avoid issues with browser that don't understand the pseudo selectors, plus background-colors are not an issue.

The downside is however, that it adds some extra whitespace after the last cell.

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