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I am a total cryptography novice and was looking to have a simple (ha!) AESEncryption utility class that I could use for reading/writing files and string with AES keys. Something like:

String toEcnrypt = "This is a secret message!";
AESEcnryption aes = new AESEncryption(); // 256-bit by default
String encrypted = aes.encrypt(toEncrypt);

// Do some stuff

String shouldBeSameAsFirstString = aes.decrypt(encrypted);

The idea being that every time an AESEncryption is instantiated, a KeySpec is generated (and can be returned by the API for subsequent storage). Here's what I cooked up after examining the code of much, much brighter people than myself (so if you see your code here, thanks!):

public class AESEncryption {

private SecretKeySpec keySpec;

public AESEncryption()
{
    super();
    setKeySpec(AES256Encryption.generateAES256KeySpec());
}

// Uses 256-bit encryption by default.
public static SecretKeySpec generateAES256KeySpec()
{
    // Stack variables
    byte[] byteArray = new byte[16];
    SecretKey oTmpKey = null;
    KeyGenerator oKeyGen;
    try
    {
        oKeyGen = KeyGenerator.getInstance("AES");
        oKeyGen.init(256);
        oTmpKey = oKeyGen.generateKey();
    }
    catch(Throwable oThrown)
    {
        throw new RuntimeException(oThrown);
    }

    byteArray = oTmpKey.getEncoded();

    return new SecretKeySpec(byteArray, "AES");
}

public String encrypt(final String p_strPlaintext)
{
    String strEncrypted = null;

    try
    {
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance("AES");
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, keySpec);
        strEncrypted = Base64.encodeBase64String(cipher
            .doFinal(p_strPlaintext.getBytes()));
    }
    catch(Throwable oThrown)
    {
        System.out.println(oThrown.getMessage());
        throw new RuntimeException(oThrown);
    }

    return strEncrypted;
}

}

For the Base64 En/Decoding I'm using Commons Codec - why? Because like I said I'm a crypto novice and that's the only thing I could find that seemed to get the job done!

When I use this code:

// This creates a unique key spec for this instance.
AESEncryption aes = new AESEncryption();

String toEncrypt = "blah";

// Throws a Throwable and prints the following to the console:
// "Illegal key size or default parameters"
String encrypted = aes.encrypt(toEncrypt);

I saw this question on SO where the asker had the same problem and I see that I may be missing the JCE. Knowing next to nothing about JCE, here's what I've collected:

  • The JCE is required for the AES algorithm to execute on the Java platform
  • The JCE downloads as a ZIP but really just contains two JARs

I put these 2 JARs (US_export_policy and local_policy) on my project's build path (Eclipse) and reran the code. Again the same problem. I know the linked article references installation instructions that recommended including these JARs in the JRE, but at runtime my app should only care about finding the JARs on the classpath - it shouldn't care about where it finds them on the classpath!

Is there anything I can do from inside Elcipse to make sure the JCE is available to my runtime classpath? Or am I way off base and have a bug in my code that is causing these errors?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could simply use 128 bit AES keys. They are secure enough 99% of the time. Either that or use 256 bit keys and install the unlimited strength crypto files as indicated in the readme. If you could simply put them in the classpath everybody would simply copy the contents into their own libraries and skip the whole protection. They don't contain runnable code, just resources.

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Alternatively, you can use the lightweight crypto API from bouncy castle, which contains an AES implementation that does not require unlimited crypto. Prepare for a bigger learning curve if you go that way though. –  owlstead May 21 '12 at 18:56
    
Thanks for the suggestion @owlstead - I'll probably install them per the readme. But a quick question - if they don't contain runnable code, then how could installing them in the JRE accomplish anything that the Eclipse buildpath couldn't? –  IAmYourFaja May 21 '12 at 18:57
    
Another question - what if I wanted to have this functionality in a consumer app? How would I force my customers to have the correctly-configured JRE? –  IAmYourFaja May 21 '12 at 18:58
    
It finds the unlimited strength crypto files by looking for them in the JRE environment by relative path. You don't force your customers anything like that, if they are knowledgable you can tell their admins - maybe create a .exe that requests admin rights - but I would not go that way. –  owlstead May 21 '12 at 19:02

i'm pretty sure those jars are meaningless in the runtime classpath. they have to be installed in the jre installation dir.

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