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I am running a server, and I want to display my own IP address.

What is the syntax for getting the computer's own (if possible, external) IP address?

Someone wrote the following code.

IPHostEntry host;
string localIP = "?";
host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
foreach (IPAddress ip in host.AddressList)
{
    if (ip.AddressFamily.ToString() == "InterNetwork")
    {
        localIP = ip.ToString();
    }
}
return localIP;

However, I generally distrust the author, and I don't understand this code. Is there a better way to do so?

share|improve this question
1  
Regarding the external IP address, I don't think there is a local approach for retrieving that. The localhost may be behind a NAT router that is translating local network addresses to public ones. Is there a (local) way to verify if that's the case? I don't know of any... –  Thiago Arrais Jul 1 '09 at 14:21
    
The sample uses the DNS to get IP-address, I have had experience with DNS having wrong information. For that case the sample could respond with wrong information. –  leiflundgren Mar 21 '12 at 14:05
    
@leiflundgren I have also had experience with DNS having wrong information. My answer describes how I obtained the IP address that I needed without relying on DNS when I faced that situation. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Oct 11 '13 at 1:08
6  
Using LINQ: Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.Where(o => o.AddressFamily == System.Net.Sockets.AddressFamily.InterNetwork).First().ToString() –  luisperezphd Oct 13 '13 at 17:30
1  
This is a typical situation where users with completely different needs tend to ask the same question. Some people want to know how their computer can be reached from the public network. The canonical answer is STUN, though many answer with hacks dependent on random third parties. Some people just want to know their IP address(es) on local network(s). Good answers in this case mention NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces Method. –  Stéphane Gourichon Nov 11 at 6:54

24 Answers 24

Nope, that is pretty much the best way to do it. As a machine could have several IP addresses you need to iterate the collection of them to find the proper one.

Edit: The only thing I would change would be to change this:

if (ip.AddressFamily.ToString() == "InterNetwork")

to this:

if (ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)

There is no need to ToString an enumeration for comparison.

share|improve this answer
2  
I want the external IP address, if possible. I suppose it's not going to be that possible if I am behind NAT. –  Nefzen Jul 1 '09 at 13:38
3  
No, your machine will only know its NAT address. –  Andrew Hare Jul 1 '09 at 13:39
3  
"InterNetwork" is the machine's IPv4 address. –  Andrew Hare Jul 1 '09 at 14:48
14  
I would also suggest a break statement after the IP has been found to avoid unnecessarily iterating further through the collection (in this case I doubt the performance impact will ever matter, but I like to stress generally good coding habits) –  Eric J. Apr 26 '11 at 15:53
5  
Note that this might fail when a machine has multiple 'InterNetwork' ports (In my case: an ethernet card an a virtual machine port). The current code will give you the last IP on the list. –  christian studer Apr 28 '11 at 9:12

The only way to know your public IP is to ask someone else to tell you; this code may help you:

public string GetPublicIP()
{
    String direction = "";
    WebRequest request = WebRequest.Create("http://checkip.dyndns.org/");
    using (WebResponse response = request.GetResponse())
    using (StreamReader stream = new StreamReader(response.GetResponseStream()))
    {
        direction = stream.ReadToEnd();
    }

    //Search for the ip in the html
    int first = direction.IndexOf("Address: ") + 9;
    int last = direction.LastIndexOf("</body>");
    direction = direction.Substring(first, last - first);

    return direction;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Do you know your code sample was mentioned in Question 13 Twenty C# Questions Explained of the Microsoft Academy? The presenter apologizes for stealing your code. From 8:30 minutes onwards. See this. :) –  user2609980 Aug 24 at 20:42

Cleaner and an all in one solution :D

//This returns the first IP4 address or null
return Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork);
share|improve this answer
    
Problems with this code: * It assumes a computer has only a single IP address. Many have multiple. * It only considers IPV4 addresses. Add InterNetworkV6 to include IPV6. –  Robert Bratton Oct 31 at 15:19
    
@RobertBratton, Thank you for your replay. The problem did not not assume a multi IP address or IPV6, with slight modifications to this code it can handle specific different problems. –  Mohammed A. Fadil Nov 1 at 7:09
WebClient webClient = new WebClient();
string IP = webClient.DownloadString("http://myip.ozymo.com/");
share|improve this answer
7  
icanhazip.com works. –  Doug Wilson May 30 '13 at 17:09
1  
ifconfig.me/ip also works –  brianary Nov 13 '13 at 17:56

If you can't rely on getting your IP address from a DNS server (which has happened to me), you can use the following approach:

The System.Net.NetworkInformation namespace contains a NetworkInterface class, which has a static GetAllNetworkInterfaces method.

This method will return all "network interfaces" on your machine, and there are generally quite a few, even if you only have a wireless adapter and/or an ethernet adapter hardware installed on your machine. All of these network interfaces have valid IP addresses for your local machine, although you probably only want one.

If you're looking for one IP address, then you'll need to filter the list down until you can identify the right address. You will probably need to do some experimentation, but I had success with the following approach:

  • Filter out any NetworkInterfaces that are inactive by checking for OperationalStatus == OperationalStatus.Up. This will exclude your physical ethernet adapter, for instance, if you don't have a network cable plugged in.

For each NetworkInterface, you can get an IPInterfaceProperties object using the GetIPProperties method, and from an IPInterfaceProperties object you can access the UnicastAddresses property for a list of UnicastIPAddressInformation objects.

  • Filter out non-preferred unicast addresses by checking for DuplicateAddressDetectionState == DuplicateAddressDetectionState.Preferred
  • Filter out "virtual" addresses by checking for AddressPreferredLifetime != UInt32.MaxValue.

At this point I take the address of the first (if any) unicast address that matches all of these filters.

share|improve this answer
    
In this particular case, the OP wanted to see his external IP address, so the DNS solution is probably the way to go. But for iterating local IP addresses, this is the approach I recommend. –  Matt Davis Oct 31 '12 at 8:01
1  
Agreed that DNS is an easier way to get the IP address. I mentioned in my answer that this approach works when your DNS is unreliable. I used this in an environment where DNS was messed up such that if you moved a machine from one ethernet port to another, DNS would still report the old IP address, so it was nearly useless for my purposes. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Apr 13 '13 at 17:21
using System.Net;

string host = Dns.GetHostName();
IPHostEntry ip = Dns.GetHostEntry(host);
Console.WriteLine(ip.AddressList[0].ToString());

Just tested this on my machine and it works.

share|improve this answer
2  
it will get u local ip,and question is about external IP i.e.Ip with which u browse internet.. –  Sangram Apr 7 '11 at 19:58

Don't rely on InterNetwork all the time because you can have more than one device which also uses IP4 which would screw up the results in getting your IP. Now, if you would like you may just copy this and please review it or update it to how you see fit.

First I get the address of the router (gateway) If it comes back that I am connected to a gateway (which mean not connected directly into the modem wireless or not) then we have our gateway address as IPAddress else we a null pointer IPAddress reference.

Then we need to get the computer's list of IPAddresses. This is where things are not that hard because routers (all routers) use 4 bytes (...). The first three are the most important because any computer connected to it will have the IP4 address matching the first three bytes. Ex: 192.168.0.1 is standard for router default IP unless changed by the adminstrator of it. '192.168.0' or whatever they may be is what we need to match up. And that is all I did in IsAddressOfGateway function. The reason for the length matching is because not all addresses (which are for the computer only) have the length of 4 bytes. If you type in netstat in the cmd, you will find this to be true. So there you have it. Yes, it takes a little more work to really get what you are looking for. Process of elimination. And for God's sake, do not find the address by pinging it which takes time because first you are sending the address to be pinged and then it has to send the result back. No, work directly with .Net classes which deal with your system environment and you will get the answers you are looking for when it has to solely do with your computer.

Now if you are directly connected to your modem, the process is almost the same because the modem is your gateway but the submask is not the same because your getting the information directly from your DNS Server via modem and not masked by the router serving up the Internet to you although you still can use the same code because the last byte of the IP assigned to the modem is 1. So if IP sent from the modem which does change is 111.111.111.1' then you will get 111.111.111.(some byte value). Keep in mind the we need to find the gateway information because there are more devices which deal with internet connectivity than your router and modem.

Now you see why you DON'T change your router's first two bytes 192 and 168. These are strictly distinguished for routers only and not internet use or we would have a serious issue with IP Protocol and double pinging resulting in crashing your computer. Image that your assigned router IP is 192.168.44.103 and you click on a site with that IP as well. OMG! Your computer would not know what to ping. Crash right there. To avoid this issue, only routers are assigned these and not for internet usage. So leave the first two bytes of the router alone.

static IPAddress FindLanAddress()
{
    IPAddress gateway = FindGetGatewayAddress();
    if (gateway == null)
        return null;

    IPAddress[] pIPAddress = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName());

    foreach (IPAddress address in pIPAddress)            {
        if (IsAddressOfGateway(address, gateway))
                return address;
    return null;
}
static bool IsAddressOfGateway(IPAddress address, IPAddress gateway)
{
    if (address != null && gateway != null)
        return IsAddressOfGateway(address.GetAddressBytes(),gateway.GetAddressBytes());
    return false;
}
static bool IsAddressOfGateway(byte[] address, byte[] gateway)
{
    if (address != null && gateway != null)
    {
        int gwLen = gateway.Length;
        if (gwLen > 0)
        {
            if (address.Length == gateway.Length)
            {
                --gwLen;
                int counter = 0;
                for (int i = 0; i < gwLen; i++)
                {
                    if (address[i] == gateway[i])
                        ++counter;
                }
                return (counter == gwLen);
            }
        }
    }
    return false;

}
static IPAddress FindGetGatewayAddress()
{
    IPGlobalProperties ipGlobProps = IPGlobalProperties.GetIPGlobalProperties();

    foreach (NetworkInterface ni in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces())
    {
        IPInterfaceProperties ipInfProps = ni.GetIPProperties();
        foreach (GatewayIPAddressInformation gi in ipInfProps.GatewayAddresses)
            return gi.Address;
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't make sense: foreach (GatewayIPAddressInformation gi in ipInfProps.GatewayAddresses) return gi.Address; –  Edwin Evans Jul 3 '12 at 0:06
2  
There is no guarantee that "any computer connected to a gateway will have the IP4 address matching the first three bytes". It depends on the subnet mask, which can contain various bit combinations. And furthermore, starting bytes don't have to be "192.168", as described here. This code will only work if subnet mask is 255.255.255.0, and it will do so in a rather complicated way IMO. –  Groo Jan 15 '13 at 22:04

If you want to avoid using DNS

        List<IPAddress> ipList = new List<IPAddress>();
        foreach (var ni in NetworkInterface.GetAllNetworkInterfaces()) {
            foreach (var ua in ni.GetIPProperties().UnicastAddresses) {
                if (ua.Address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork) {
                    Console.WriteLine("found ip " + ua.Address.ToString());
                    ipList.Add(ua.Address);
                }
            }
        }
share|improve this answer

I just thought that I would add my own, one-liner (even though there are many other useful answers already).


string ipAddress = new WebClient().DownloadString("http://icanhazip.com");

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this has a potential memory leak. The WebClient is not properly disposed of. Instead, use: using (var client = new WebClient()) { return client.DownloadString("icanhazip.com/").Trim(); } –  FOO Sep 18 at 4:18

For getting the current public IP address, all you need to do is create an ASPX page with the following line on the page load event:

Response.Write(HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress.ToString());
share|improve this answer
namespace NKUtilities 
{
    using System;
    using System.Net;
    using System.Net.Sockets;

    public class DNSUtility
    {
        public static int Main(string [] args)
        {
            string strHostName = "";
            try {

                if(args.Length == 0)
                {
                    // Getting Ip address of local machine...
                    // First get the host name of local machine.
                    strHostName = Dns.GetHostName();
                    Console.WriteLine ("Local Machine's Host Name: " +  strHostName);
                }
                else
                {
                    // Otherwise, get the IP address of the host provided on the command line.
                    strHostName = args[0];
                }

                // Then using host name, get the IP address list..
                IPHostEntry ipEntry = Dns.GetHostEntry (strHostName);
                IPAddress [] addr = ipEntry.AddressList;

                for(int i = 0; i < addr.Length; i++)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("IP Address {0}: {1} ", i, addr[i].ToString());
                }
                return 0;

            } 
            catch(SocketException se) 
            {
                Console.WriteLine("{0} ({1})", se.Message, strHostName);
                return -1;
            } 
            catch(Exception ex) 
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error: {0}.", ex.Message);
                return -1;
            }
        }
    }
}

Look here for details.

You have to remember your computer can have more than one IP (actually it always does) - so which one are you after.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

 IPAddress[] localIPs = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName());
 String MyIp = localIPs[0].ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
This returns a number of local IP addresses, one of which is the IPv4 address, however its difficult to find the correct one in the list. –  Contango Sep 15 '11 at 14:34

Maybe by external IP you can consider (if you are in a Web server context) using this

Request.ServerVariables["LOCAL_ADDR"];

I was asking the same question as you and I found it in this stackoverflow article.

It worked for me.

share|improve this answer

Dr. Wily's Apprentice: 2 problems with this:

1) Having a static ip address assigned causes the AddressPreferredLifetime to be UInt32.MaxValue. I removed the comparison.

2) You also need to filter out NetworkInterfaceType.Loopback on the interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Good information. That's what I meant by "You will probably need to do some experimentation". –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Oct 11 '13 at 0:55
using System;
using System.Net;

namespace IPADDRESS
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            String strHostName = string.Empty;
            if (args.Length == 0)
            {                
                /* First get the host name of local machine.*/
                strHostName = Dns.GetHostName();
                Console.WriteLine("Local Machine's Host Name: " + strHostName);
            }
            else
            {
                strHostName = args[0];
            }
            /* Then using host name, get the IP address list..*/
            IPHostEntry ipEntry = Dns.GetHostByName(strHostName);
            IPAddress[] addr = ipEntry.AddressList;
            for (int i = 0; i < addr.Length; i++)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("IP Address {0}: {1} ", i, addr[i].ToString());
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Next time please explain your code sample. –  Johnny Graber Oct 20 '12 at 12:17
return Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork);

Simple single line of code that returns the first internal IPV4 address or null if there are none. Added as a comment above, but may be useful to someone (some solutions above will return multiple addresses that need further filtering).

It's also easy to return loopback instead of null I guess with:

return Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.FirstOrDefault(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork) ?? new IPAddress( new byte[] {127, 0, 0, 1} );
share|improve this answer
    
How about IPAddress.Loopback? :) –  C Sharper Oct 12 '12 at 17:20

If you are running in intranet you'll be able to get local machine IP address and if not you'll get external ip address with this: Web:

//this will bring the IP for the current machine on browser
System.Web.HttpContext.Current.Request.UserHostAddress

Desktop:

//This one will bring all local IPs for the desired namespace
IPAddress[] localIPs = Dns.GetHostAddresses(Dns.GetHostName());
share|improve this answer

In essence that seems about the right way to do it, two comments however:

  • I would do the ip.AddressFamily comparison based on the enum itself without a ToString()... it avoids any risk of typos or mangling in the string value
  • Keep in mind that a single machine may very well have multiple external addresses... this is most common in a machine with multiple network interfaces (multiple ethernet, or ethernet and wireless), but by no means impossible on just a single ethernet connection
share|improve this answer

And this is to get all local IPs in csv format in VB.NET

Imports System.Net
Imports System.Net.Sockets

Function GetIPAddress() As String
    Dim ipList As List(Of String) = New List(Of String)
    Dim host As IPHostEntry
    Dim localIP As String = "?"
    host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName())
    For Each ip As IPAddress In host.AddressList
        If ip.AddressFamily = AddressFamily.InterNetwork Then
            localIP = ip.ToString()
            ipList.Add(localIP)
        End If
    Next
    Dim ret As String = String.Join(",", ipList.ToArray)
    Return ret
End Function
share|improve this answer
namespace NKUtilities 
{
    using System;
    using System.Net;

    public class DNSUtility
    {
        public static int Main (string [] args)
        {

          String strHostName = new String ("");
          if (args.Length == 0)
          {
              // Getting Ip address of local machine...
              // First get the host name of local machine.
              strHostName = Dns.GetHostName ();
              Console.WriteLine ("Local Machine's Host Name: " +  strHostName);
          }
          else
          {
              strHostName = args[0];
          }

          // Then using host name, get the IP address list..
          IPHostEntry ipEntry = DNS.GetHostByName (strHostName);
          IPAddress [] addr = ipEntry.AddressList;

          for (int i = 0; i < addr.Length; i++)
          {
              Console.WriteLine ("IP Address {0}: {1} ", i, addr[i].ToString ());
          }
          return 0;
        }    
     }
}
share|improve this answer

To find IP address list I have used this solution

public static IEnumerable<string> GetAddresses()
{
    var host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
    return (from ip in host.AddressList where ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.lo select ip.ToString()).ToList();
}

But I personally like below solution to get local valid IP address

public static IPAddress GetIPAddress(string hostName)
{
    Ping ping = new Ping();
    var replay = ping.Send(hostName);

    if (replay.Status == IPStatus.Success)
    {
        return replay.Address;
    }
    return null;
 }

public static void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Local IP Address: " + GetIPAddress(Dns.GetHostName()));
    Console.WriteLine("Google IP:" + GetIPAddress("google.com");
    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer

The LINQ solution:

Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName()).AddressList.Where(ip => ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork).Select(ip => ip.ToString()).FirstOrDefault() ?? ""
share|improve this answer

Here is how i solved it. i know if you have several physical interfaces this might not select the exact eth you want.

private string FetchIP()
{
    //Get all IP registered
    List<string> IPList = new List<string>();
    IPHostEntry host;
    host = Dns.GetHostEntry(Dns.GetHostName());
    foreach (IPAddress ip in host.AddressList)
    {
        if (ip.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
        {
            IPList.Add(ip.ToString());
        }
    }

    //Find the first IP which is not only local
    foreach (string a in IPList)
    {
        Ping p = new Ping();
        string[] b = a.Split('.');
        string ip2 = b[0] + "." + b[1] + "." + b[2] + ".1";
        PingReply t = p.Send(ip2);
        p.Dispose();
        if (t.Status == IPStatus.Success && ip2 != a)
        {
            return a;
        }
    }
    return null;
}
share|improve this answer
IPAddress[] ips;
string MYIPADDRESS;
string hostname = Dns.GetHostName();
ips = Dns.GetHostAddresses(hostname);          

MYIPAddress = ips[2].ToString();
share|improve this answer

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