Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I don't understand why one scenario evaluates false and the other true.

Scenario 1:

> '' == ''
true

Scenario 2:

> '' == ('' || undefined)
false

Is scenario 2 not asking if (empty string) is equal to: (empty string) OR undefined?

I'm sure I'm missing something fundamental here, which is really what I'm trying to figure out. I can easily code around this, but I'd like to learn why it's happening... for next time, ya know?

share|improve this question
1  
your question is just like saying that 2 == 3 || 2 is testing if 2 equals 3 or 2. If you really stop to think about it as a computer would read it, you can see that it doesn't make sense –  Juan Mendes May 21 '12 at 19:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
'' == ( '' || undefined )

Is not the same as

( '' == '' ) || ( '' == undefined )

It's more along the lines of:

var foo = '' || undefined; // Results in undefined

And then comparing foo to an empty string:

foo == ''; // undefined == '' will result in false

Explanation

The logical || is a short-circuiting operator. If the argument to its left is truthy, the argument to the right is not even evaluated. In JavaScript, '' is not considered to be truthy:

if ( '' ) console.log( 'Empty Strings are True?' );

As such undefined is returned and compared against an empty string. When you perform this logic within a the parenthesis, the '' and the undefined don't know about the impending equality check that is waiting to happen - they just want to know which of them is going to survive this evaluation.

share|improve this answer
    
"When you perform this logic within a the parenthesis, the '' and the undefined don't know about the impending equality check that is waiting to happen" That was what made it click for me. Thanks very much @JonathanSampson –  Aaron Francis May 21 '12 at 23:33

try '' == '' || '' == undefined

As in almost all programming languages, the expressions at both sides of an operator must evaluate to a valid operand. || is logical OR operator which is used to evaluate a pair of boolean operands.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean by "|| is logical OR which requires a pair of boolean expressions" –  ajax333221 May 21 '12 at 19:32
    
|| doesn't require to boolean expressions! –  gdoron May 21 '12 at 19:34
    
@gdoron boolean expression is one that results a value of true or false. (true || false) is an expression as well as ((true && false)||(false||false)). In both cases you require a boolean expression on each side of the logical operator. –  Pencho Ilchev May 21 '12 at 19:39
    
But it's not true... you can write var x = 0 || '' || 3|| null; alert(x) // 3 –  gdoron May 21 '12 at 19:44

Let's break it:

'' == ('' || undefined) // return "undefined"
'' == undefined // false

|| return the first true value or the last value.

DEMO

You want this:

'' == undefined  || '' == false

undefined is == only to null, and not to all other "falsy" values:

  • 0
  • "" - empty string
  • NaN
  • false
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.