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This question already has an answer here:

Accidentally I have the following issue:

typedef void VOID;

class Cls1
{
public:
  VOID Clear(VOID);
};

And the compiler (g++ 4.6.1) reported

error: 'anonymous' has incomplete type error: 'invalid use of 'VOID {aka void}'

Is there a particular reason 'void' differ from 'VOID'?

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marked as duplicate by Ben Voigt c++ May 3 '15 at 4:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
The C++ faq has a good write up on the use of f(void);. – Jesse Good May 21 '12 at 21:16
    
declaring a void parameter list with a typedef is nonstandard – Gene Bushuyev May 21 '12 at 21:33
    
This question I see many times. Try google before ask a question. – Xearinox May 21 '12 at 21:53

OK, the clang compiler gives a more readable error:

test.cpp:14:20: error: empty parameter list defined with a typedef of 'void' not allowed in C++ void Clear(VOID);

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There's nothing different.

In C++ empty parameter lists are empty, not "void".

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I prefer to explicitly add "void" for empty parameter lists, as in C empty parameter lists without "void" assumes you can pass arbitrary params. – xis May 21 '12 at 21:04
4  
@xis19: you need to decide if you're writing C or C++ code though. In C++, an empty parameter list is idiomatic – jalf May 21 '12 at 21:05
3  
@xis19 - OK. vOv I like to name all my C++ variables with '$' at the beginning because that's how it's done in Perl. – Crazy Eddie May 21 '12 at 21:24
2  
@xis19, C doesn't have member functions, following C rules for member functions makes no sense. In C++ f(void) is considered an abomination, but tolerated for C compatibility. Doing the same with a typedef is so abominable it's not even allowed. – Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 22:15

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