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Is it a good OO programming practice to create a method in a base class that would know about a derived class?

For example consider the classes A, B, C, D where class B inherits from A and classes C and D inherit from B. Consider now a method that is common to all classes that inherit from A (including A itself) and which needs to know about class B in order to work (eg: the relative distance of objects of class A/B/C/ or D from an object B). Since this method is common for all classes (A, B, C, D) it sounds logical that it should be placed within class A. However in this case we would have a method in the base class that would "know" of a derived class.

Example:

Class A {
# simple coordinate system
    distance_to_complex_coordinate_system (B complexCoord) {
         return complexCoord.distance_to_simple_coord_system(self)
    }

}

Class B extends A {
# complex coordinate system
    distance_to_simple_coordinate_system (simpleCoord) {
         # do calculations
    }

}

Class C extends A {}
Class D extends A {}
...

In the above example distance_to_complex_coordinate_system is a method that all simple coordinate systems (namely A, B, C, and D) should have and the implementation is exactly the same for all of them. It is not an abstract class, and therefore should not be overridden.

Does this make sense in an OO viewpoint and if it does is it really a good programming practice? If not, any suggestions on how to avoid this will be highly appreciated.

To my point of view it is not a good practice but I cannot find a nice way to avoid it without unnecessarily duplicating code. btw although probably not important - I'm using Perl.

share|improve this question
    
You say "the implementation is exactly the same for all them" which leads me to believe that A knows everything it needs to know in order to calculate a value for distance_to_simple_coord_system(). You had originally stated that A needs to know about implementation in B but this doesn't appear to be the case after your clarification. I suspect, that your subclasses will have slightly different implementations of distance_to_simple_coordinate_system () otherwise why Override this method? –  Brad May 21 '12 at 22:23
    
distance_to_simple_coord_system is a method of class B and only this class knows how to calculate it. Class A and all other classes need to know that class B exists and therefore use distance_to_complex_coordinate_system –  mns May 21 '12 at 22:29
    
I don't want to override distance_to_simple_coordinate_system this method only exists in class B and nowhere else. The problem is with distance_to_complex_coordinate_system that needs to know that class B exists. –  mns May 21 '12 at 22:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

An alternative solution based on your recent clarification of your question.

I think the functionality in class B should be broken out into a helper class (composition). You have stated that B is integral to knowing how to calculate distance_to_simple_coord_system(). Can you remove B from the class hierarchy?

Something like this, where A owns an instance of B but it is not a subclass anymore. How you actually create and set an instance of B is up to you.

class A {
    B b = new B();

    distance_to_complex_coordinate_system() {
         // i'm guessing that passing "this" maybe of use to you
         b.distance_to_simple_coord_system(this);
    }
}

class B {  // does not extend A
    Public distance_to_simple_coord_system(A a) {}
}
class C extends A {}
class D extends A {}

[EDIT]

Following your comments...

I agree with you. What is not feeling right here is the dependancy on class B for all of your hierarchy and its not the parent class. This is fundamentially wrong for OO design and you need to remove the shared feature out this class either by moving it up into A or into another independant helper class.

Note: Sometimes OO design does not lend itself well to a concrete inheritence hierarchy in the real world, contrary to what text books from 10 years ago would lead us to believe.

This solution allows you to keep your A, B, C, D hierarchy for the bits that are necessary, and I use an Interface to break out the shared feature from B.

class A {
    Calc calc = new SimpleCalc();

    distance_to_complex_coordinate_system() {
         getCalc().distance_to_simple_coord_system(this);
    }

    Calc getCalc() {
        return this.calc;
    }
}

class B extends A {}
class C extends A {}
class D extends A {}

interface Calc {
    distance_to_simple_coord_system(A a);
}

class SimpleCalc implements Calc {
    distance_to_simple_coord_system(A a) {
        // implementation assuming you don't need an "instanceof B" passed in
    }
}

Q: Why use an Interface?

A: So that you can determine the implementation at runtime for how to make a calculation based on the class A, B, C, or D

Consider that C may require a different way of calculating its distance_to_complex_coordinate_system, you can do this...

   /*
    * Calculator specific to C
    */
    class CalcForC implements Calc {
        distance_to_simple_coord_system(C c) {
            // implementation specific to "C"
        }
    }

    class C extends A {
        Calc calcForC = new Calc();

        /* override */
        Calc getCalc() {
            return this.calcForC;
        }
    }

    C c = new C();
    c.distance_to_complex_coordinate_system();      // defined on A but calls getCalc() on C
share|improve this answer
    
I really appreciate your help. Yes I could remove B from the hierarchy but then I would have to re-implement in B the common functionality between A and B. Also B should also be able to call distance_to_complex_coordinate_system. What I though based on your suggestion is that probably I could create another class AB which would be the parent of A and B (B does not extend A) containing the common functionality between the two. Then separately for A and B I could implement distance_to_complex_coordinate_system in each of them. –  mns May 22 '12 at 3:16
    
I still have a feeling though that this is somehow an artificial/technical solution and not elegant enough. It troubles me conceptually that I need to define distance_to_complex_coordinate_system in two places (both in A and B). –  mns May 22 '12 at 3:18
    
I think the design after your edit is in the correct direction. I will try to implement it and see how it works. Thanks for you help. –  mns May 23 '12 at 18:38

You are correct, its smells bad having a method in A that has a need to know about an implementation in a subclass. Perhaps you need to factor this feature out into another class (not in the inheritance hierarchy) and favour composition over inheritance in this case.

A little difficult to say for sure what to do without knowing more about your code. @Styxxy raises a good point about using abstract methods as a way around this, but that all depends on what you mean when you say "A needs to know about B".

If an object is instantiated as an A, then how can it be cast down to a B in order to obtain the implementation you're talking about? It can't.

However, if an object are created as B can call a common method A that in turn calls abstract methods that will be overridden by its subclasses (e.g. B). This is loosely what the Template design pattern does. The parent class A defines some steps that are to be taken and the order of those steps, but it defers the implementation to the subclasses.

abstract class A {
    public void doStuff() {
        doThis();
        doThat();
    }

    abstract void doThis();

    abstract void doThat();
}

class B extends A {
    @Override
    void doThis() {
        // implementation
    }

    @Override
    void doThat() {
        // implementation
    }
}


// from somewhere in code...your subclass B knows doThis() will be called before doThat()
B b = new B();
b.doStuff();

Please excuse any syntax errors I'm not validating correctness here just trying to get a point across

share|improve this answer
    
Brad and @Styxxy thank for your quick answers. I think I understood your suggestions (if not please correct me) and totally agree with you. However my main concern is that the method is not really abstract, it's just a method which is always the same and just needs to know of the existence of class B. I have edited the question to make this point cleaner. –  mns May 21 '12 at 22:21

If it is a method also in the right context of A, however cannot have an implementation in A, you can declare it as an abstract method, that needs to be implemented by any derived class. (Or you can have an implementation that only knows about A, but you can override in the derived classes.) If you have the feeling that you have to much cross-class knowledge, you might not have abstracted enough.

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