Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to to read each line from a text file and put in array column ,I really tried this :

    string buffer[256];
string a;
ifstream myfile ("1.txt");

for(i=0;i<10000;i++)
    {

        //readArrivalTimes(i);
        myfile.getline (buffer,100);
        a[i]=buffer;
    }

but It is not working

so I did try for one of the solutions you gave me guys and I did it like this :

std::vector<std::string> v;
std::string buffer;


string a[1024];
ifstream myfile;
myfile.open("1.txt");

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    getline (myfile, buffer);

    a[i]= buffer;
    cout << buffer << "\n";
}

but as we can see it's string !

can we make it works as integer?

[Solved :)]

first of all thanks for everybody help me with this, I really appreciate your help, I am a totally new to c++.

and for sure it's not a homework.

I did some modifications to the code so it can works with integers

int a[1024];
ifstream myfile;
myfile.open("1.txt");

for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    getline (myfile, buffer);

    a[i]= atoi(buffer.c_str());
    cout << buffer << "\n";
}

thank you very much.

share|improve this question
1  
what does your debugger tell you? –  pm100 May 21 '12 at 21:19
1  
If you are using strings, then why not read the data into a string to begin with? Also, where is your array of lines? –  K-ballo May 21 '12 at 21:19
    
this error is cming : 2 IntelliSense: a value of type "char *" cannot be assigned to an entity of type "int" c:\users\hajjaj\desktop\rr\roundrobin.cpp 57 8 RR –  HAJJAJ May 21 '12 at 21:23
2  
Do you want to read the entire file into one string, or into an array of strings, one string per line of the file? For the first see: stackoverflow.com/questions/3303527/…. For the second, stackoverflow.com/questions/1567082/… –  Jerry Coffin May 21 '12 at 21:23
4  
Stop changing the code!! –  Default May 21 '12 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are many mistakes in your code.
Some are already mentioned, as assigning the char* to the int array.

But your approach is more C than C++. In C++ it would look more like this:

std::vector<std::string> lines;
std::ifstream myfile("1.txt");
if(myfile.isopen())
{
    std::string line;
    while(getline(myfile, line))
    {
        lines.push_back(line);
    }
}

I haven't tested it, but it should show you a way how to do this.

Edit: Changed the code according to comments.

Edit again to make it work with integers:

std::vector<int> numbers;
std::ifstream myfile("1.txt");
if(myfile.isopen())
{
    std::string line;
    while(getline(myfile, line))
    {
        int number;
        std::istringstream(line) >> number;
        numbers.push_back(number);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
There are many mistakes in this code (an extra line is pushed onto lines). The while loop should look like: while(getline(myfile, line)) –  Loki Astari May 21 '12 at 22:08
3  
No no no! while (myfile.good()) is an iostream anti-pattern! You should use while (getline(myfile, line)). Downvoted for perpetuating that bad, bad style. –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 22:09
    
@JonathanWakely: Its not just iostream ant-pattern (unless you mean IO in the general language agnostic way). It is wrong in most languages. –  Loki Astari May 21 '12 at 22:12
1  
@LokiAstari, I meant C++ iostreams specifically. I won't comment on other languages but it annoys me that people insist on using iostreams like that when it makes the code longer and the results wrong. Doing it right (as in your comment) is not only less typing but actually works. Why do people do it the other way?! –  Jonathan Wakely May 21 '12 at 22:19
    
@LokiAstari: Sorry, I didn't knew that. I've corrected my mistake and memorized it. –  Skalli May 22 '12 at 8:06

a is a string, which is an abstraction for a collection of characters.

a[i] will return a reference to an individual character.

buffer is an array of characters. The C/C++ convection in that the name of the array names a pointer to its first element.

So, what you are doing in your loop is assigning the ith element of a to the address of the beginning of your buffer, which is almost certainly not what you want to do.

Likely what you want to do is make a an array of strings; i.e. replace

string a;

with

string a[10000];

There's other things to address in your code; for example, what if your file has < 10k lines?

share|improve this answer
    
He changed the declaration of a.. –  Default May 21 '12 at 21:24
2  
or, he could use a vector –  Default May 21 '12 at 21:25
    
He definately should go with std::vector! –  Skalli May 21 '12 at 21:27
    
I'm guessing there's some homework restrictions here. But didn't want to ask. meta.stackexchange.com/questions/130558/… –  JohnMcG May 21 '12 at 21:29
    int a[1024];
ifstream myfile;
myfile.open("1.txt");
for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{
    getline (myfile, buffer);

    a[i]= atoi(buffer.c_str());
    cout << buffer << "\n";
}

this is the right answer

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, your code may work, but it's not good C++. It's pretty bad style. I've updated my code to work with integers too, have a look at it. –  Skalli Mar 4 '13 at 17:34

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.