Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here's the code:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    { 
        int xd2 = 5;

        for (double xd = (double)xd2; xd <= 6; xd += 0.01)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(xd);
        }

    }

and here's the output: enter image description here

I want to keep on adding 0.01 (as You can see on the screen, sometimes it happens to add 0.99999) Thanks

share|improve this question
7  
Doubles do work properly in C# ;-) –  Dave Ziegler May 21 '12 at 21:48
1  
Why do you cast an int to a double anyway? –  Leon Cullens May 21 '12 at 21:49
1  
Try using a different step, for example, 0.125. Once you realize why, you will learn something really instructive :) –  dasblinkenlight May 21 '12 at 21:51
    
Jon Skeet has a series of articles on this topic: Binary Floating Point, Decimal Floating Point –  Brian May 22 '12 at 14:25
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use decimal if you want to keep this kind of accuracy.

Floating point types cannot accurately represent certain values. I suggest reading What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic for a comprehensive explanation.

decimal xd2 = 5m;

for (decimal xd = xd2; xd <= 6m; xd += 0.01m)
{
    Console.WriteLine(xd);
}
share|improve this answer
5  
It's worth noting that decimal is not fundamentally more "precise" than double (except for the greater number of bits it has at its disposal). It's simply stored in base 10, so numbers expressed in the familiar decimal point notation (as in your example) can be expressed exactly, while in the base-2 float and double types, they can't. float and double can exactly store numbers expressed in binary point notation; this is just not very useful, since no one uses that notation. –  Will Vousden May 21 '12 at 22:04
add comment

No. That is how doubles work.... try using decimal instead

 int xd2 = 5;

 for (decimal xd = (decimal)xd2; xd <= 6; xd += 0.01M)
 {
     Console.WriteLine(xd);
 }

if you want to stick with doubles, but only care to two decimal places use...

int xd2 = 5;

for (double xd = (double)xd2; xd <= 6; xd += 0.01)
{
   Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(xd,2));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This is because double is float pointing and this arithmetic is not precise. You can use decimal instead, like this:

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int xd2 = 5;

        for (decimal xd = (decimal)xd2; xd <= 6; xd += 0.01M)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(xd);
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

See this article too: Double precision problems on .NET

share|improve this answer
    
decimal is also a floating point type; just expressed in base 10 rather than base 2. –  Will Vousden May 21 '12 at 22:00
add comment

If possible you should always use absolute instead of iterative calculations to get rid of these kinds of rounding errors:

public static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int xd2 = 5;

    for (int i = 0; i < 100; ++i) {
        Console.WriteLine(xd2 + i * 0.01);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.