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Please consider the following code:

NSString *string = @"ä";
const char *str1 = [string cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
const char *str2 = "ä";
NSLog(@"C string comparison: %d",strcmp(str1,str2));
NSLog(@"str1: \"%s\"", str1);
NSLog(@"str2: \"%s\"", str2);

If run from a brand-new Foundation project, this program outputs:

C string comparison: 0
str1: "ä"
str2: "ä"

This is indeed what I expect to happen, because the strings are supposed to be the same.

However, if I run this exact same code somewhere deep within another codebase, I get this output:

C string comparison: 31
str1: "ä"
str2: "ä"

What could possibly explain this difference? I'm pretty sure both files are in the UTF-8 encoding. That -- different file encodings -- is the only possible explanation for this behavior, right?

Any ideas what could have gone wrong in the second case? How can I fix it?

(I should maybe mention that in the second case, the code is being run in an .mm file, i.e. under Objective-C++. Can that be an explanation for this?)

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I'd try logging what strings are actually being compared in the second case. –  Marvo May 21 '12 at 22:02
    
And make sure you put quotes around the strings when you log them to make sure you don't have some trailing white space. –  Marvo May 21 '12 at 22:03
    
@Marvo Thanks, I have changed my question accordingly. –  meh May 21 '12 at 22:08
    
You say "the exact same code" but then mention some files, so are you actually reading str1/str2 from files? If you are, double check their encoding to be 100% sure it's UTF-8, and also can you show how you read these files into str1/str2? –  Olivier Lance May 21 '12 at 22:20
    
@OlivierLance By "files", I mean the source files themselves, i.e. the files into which I paste this code. I have "checked" the encoding by opening them both in TextMate, and looking under the "File -> Re-Open With Encoding" menu, and I see a checkmark besides UTF8 there. Is there any more sophisticated way of checking the file encoding? –  meh May 21 '12 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

How a source file is encoded on disk is one thing. How the compiler believes it is encoded is another. By default, GCC assumes UTF-8 but it can be told it's in another encoding from the locale or the -finput-charset=<charset> option. I expect that Clang supports the same thing.

Xcode has its own notion of the encoding of a source file. I don't know if it adjusts the compile command to pass that in using the above option, but I wouldn't be surprised.

GCC also has a notion of the execution character set. This is how it writes strings into the binary. See the -fexec-charset=<charset> option.

So, the compiler interprets the bytes of the file according to the input character set and writes them out to the binary in the execution character set. If those two differ, then that involves a conversion. This is a per-translation unit affair, so it can happen differently for different source files.

Another issue is that "ä" has two possible representations in Unicode. It can be LATIN SMALL LETTER A WITH DIAERESIS (U+00E4) or it can be LATIN SMALL LETTER A (U+0061) followed by COMBINING DIAERESIS (U+0308). In UTF-8, that would be 0xC3 0xA4 vs. 0x61 0xCC 0x88. Your two source files may express the same character differently, which means they really do contain different strings (at all levels: C string, NSString, whatever, although NSString will ignore that difference for -compare:... methods if NSLiteralSearch is not specified; the -isEqual... methods do a literal compare, though). This would, of course, be exacerbated if those two byte sequences were being converted among encodings in different ways.

So, you need to track down the specific source files which contain the relevant strings. Check with a hex dump exactly which bytes they contain. Check the commands used to compile them (and possibly the environments if locale may play a role) to see what the compiler believes about the input and executable character sets.

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You might try using the unicode versions of your characters instead?

i.e.

NSString * string1 = @"\u00e4" ;

cf. http://blog.ablepear.com/2010/07/objective-c-tuesdays-unicode-string.html

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just a stab in the dark –  nielsbot May 21 '12 at 22:20
    
Also, I assume in NSLog the %s format specifier expects ASCII, but you're passing non-ASCII characters. –  nielsbot May 21 '12 at 22:21
    
In fact I think I am right. See this answer: stackoverflow.com/a/722984/210171 –  nielsbot May 21 '12 at 22:23
    
yup, but the log should be consistent between str1 and str2 anyway... –  Olivier Lance May 21 '12 at 22:29
    
@nielsbot thanks, but this still doesn't explain why the same code would produce different behavior at different places... That's the main issue here... –  meh May 21 '12 at 22:32

From Documentation:

The returned C string is guaranteed to be valid only until either the receiver is freed, or until the current autorelease pool is emptied, whichever occurs first.

I think in your case either the receiver is freed, or current autorelease pool is emptied.
For example

NSString *string = @"ä";
NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
const char *str3 = [string cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
[pool release];
NSLog(@"str1: \"%s\"", str3);
const char *str2 = "ä";
NSLog(@"C string comparison: %d",strcmp(str3,str2));
NSLog(@"str2: \"%s\"", str2);  

Output is

2012-05-22 17:14:50.069 test[32895:a0f] str1: "ä"
2012-05-22 17:14:50.071 test[32895:a0f] C string comparison: -195
2012-05-22 17:14:50.074 test[32895:a0f] str2: "ä" 



NSString *string = @"ä";
NSAutoreleasePool *pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
const char *str3 = [string cStringUsingEncoding:NSUTF8StringEncoding];
[pool release];
const char *str2 = "ä";
NSLog(@"C string comparison: %d",strcmp(str3,str2));
NSLog(@"str1: \"%s\"", str3);
NSLog(@"str2: \"%s\"", str2);

Output is

2012-05-22 17:19:13.226 test[33153:a0f] C string comparison: 0
2012-05-22 17:19:13.228 test[33153:a0f] str1: ""
2012-05-22 17:19:13.229 test[33153:a0f] str2: "ä"
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