Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Trying to rephrase/clean up question here:

I'm trying to do some sort of conditional statement to calculate a value. To mock my data I am assigning the value in my controller (temporarily) to see how my UI is coming along. I can perform the calculation in a function block in the view, but it's lengthy and doesn't belong there. So, I am trying now to do the calculation in a model (Calculations.cs).

The code for the calculation is working in that a value is being passed, except that my condition is failing and passing the default value of 0 when it should be passing another value based on my mocked value in the controller.

Here is the Calculations.cs

public class Calculations
{
    PriceQuote price = new PriceQuote();
    StepFilingInformation filing = new StepFilingInformation();
    public decimal Chapter7Calculation
    {
        get
        {
            return
                price.priceChapter7
                +
                ((filing.PaymentPlanRadioButton ==
                    Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes)
                ?
                price.pricePaymentPlanChapter7
                :
                0);
        }

    }
}

I originally had (filing.PaymentPlanRadioButton == Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes) checking whether or not the radio button was set to "Yes", but changed it to ReferenceEquals. This doesn't affect the outcome.

I have my controller assigning the value to PaymentPlanRadioButton to "Yes", so pricePaymentPlanChapter7 should be the value being added to priceChapter7, but it is not. Instead "0" is being added as the fall back to the condition. So PaymentPlanRadioButton is null even though I am assigning it in the controller.

I cannot figure out how to fix this. If I assign it in the model and get it to work that will not resolve the issue as when I remove the mocking controller and expect a user to choose a radio button it will still be null and the condition will fail.

Here is the "mock" controller:

public class QuoteMailerController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult EMailQuote()
    {
        Calculations calc = new Calculations();
        var total = calc.Chapter7Calculation;

        QuoteData quoteData = new QuoteData
        {
            StepFilingInformation = new Models.StepFilingInformation
            {
                //"No" is commented out, so "Yes" is assigned
                //PaymentPlanRadioButton = 
                    //Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.No,
                PaymentPlanRadioButton = 
                    Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes,
            }
         };
    }
}

And this is where I store prices (PriceQuote.cs):

public class PriceQuote
{
    public decimal priceChapter7 { get { return 799; } }
    public decimal pricePaymentPlanChapter7 { get { return 100; } }
}

This is my ViewModel:

public class QuoteData
{
    public PriceQuote priceQuote;
    public Calculations calculations;
    public StepFilingInformation stepFilingInformation { get; set; }
    public QuoteData()
    {
        PriceQuote = new PriceQuote();
        Calculations = new Calculations();
    }
}

So, the way this should work is 799 + 100 = 899, since PaymentPlan.Yes is assigned as the value to the radio button in the controller. But instead I am getting just 799 (799 + 0) because when I debug PaymentPlanRadioButton is coming up null.

Any thoughts/guidance?

Just in case, here is the PaymentPlanRadioButton located within StepFilingInformation.cs (and is one of my models):

public enum PaymentPlan
{
    No,
    Yes
}
public class PaymentPlanSelectorAttribute : SelectorAttribute
{
    public override IEnumerable<SelectListItem> GetItems()
    {
        return Selector.GetItemsFromEnum<PaymentPlan>();
    }
}       
[PaymentPlanSelector(BulkSelectionThreshold = 3)]
public PaymentPlan? PaymentPlanRadioButton { get; set; }

Sorry for the length.

FOR CONTEXT THIS IS WHAT I WAS TRYING TO GET OUT OF DOING

I originally had this calculation code in a function block in my view. The calculation works fine there, but obviously very lengthy and not appropriate.

This is what my function block looked like (partially)

@{ Model.PriceQuote.calculationChapter7
    =
    Model.PriceQuote.priceChapter7
    +
    ((Model.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlanRadioButton == 
        StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.No)
    ?
    Model.PriceQuote.priceNoPaymentPlan
    :
    Model.PriceQuote.pricePaymentPlanChapter7)
    +
    ...//more of the same
    ;
}

So I've been struggling to get this into a .cs file.

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure that your model data is being input into the controller correctly? The ?: will not be the bug. –  uosɐſ May 21 '12 at 22:51
    
Check the data, that arrives. Other than that - it would help, if you could post the definitions of the enums Price and MyPropertyEnum and a stripped-down version of MyModel that contains the important properties (e.g. MyProperty) –  skarmats May 21 '12 at 22:52
    
@skarmats Updated code...ty for comments. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 1:46
    
Based on this update, the first thing to correct is the use of ReferenceEquals - this isn't an appropriate way to compare value types (the Enum in your case). It will walways return false. –  RJ Lohan May 22 '12 at 22:25
    
Changed it back but still same problem. I tried an if/else statement, but same thing. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 22:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
+100

[Adding a 2nd answer since the added code has changed significantly since the original post].

I think the root problem here is the way you have implemented your Calculations class. The Chapter7Calculation property is always going to return 799 + 0, because it is using private local class variables to determine what values to return;

public class Calculations
{
    PriceQuote price = new PriceQuote();

    // private local variable - will ALWAYS have PaymentPlanRadioButton = null
    StepFilingInformation filing = new StepFilingInformation();

    public decimal Chapter7Calculation
    {
        get {
            return
                price.priceChapter7
                +
                (filing.PaymentPlanRadioButton == Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes)
                ? price.pricePaymentPlanChapter7
                : 0);
        }
    }
}

You have a 'controller' modifying some other instance of StepFilingInformation, which your Calculations class has no awareness of. As well, your PriceQuote class is just returning constant or static values, so there's no real need to instantiate it. Modify that class like so;

public static class PriceQuote
{
    public static decimal PriceChapter7 { get { return 799; } }
    public static decimal PricePaymentPlanChapter7 { get { return 100; } }
}

Change your Calculations to a method like so;

public decimal CalculatePrice(QuoteData quoteData)
{
    return PriceQuote.PriceChapter7 + 
        (quoteData.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlanRadioButton == Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes) 
        ? PriceQuote.PricePaymentPlanChapter7 : 0);
}

And now your controller can pass in the QuoteData instance it has created, and you should see a better result. Example code for the mock controller;

public class QuoteMailerController : Controller 
{
    public ActionResult EMailQuote()
    {
        Calculations calc = new Calculations();

        QuoteData quoteData = new QuoteData
        {
            StepFilingInformation = new Models.StepFilingInformation
            {
                PaymentPlanRadioButton = Models.StepFilingInformation.PaymentPlan.Yes,
            }
         };

         var total = calc.CalculatePrice(quoteData);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm just not doing this right. I cannot get it to work. I presume that I am taking out PriceQuote price = new PriceQuote(); and StepFilingInformation filing = new StepFilingInformation(); from the class Calculations.cs. When I try to call it in the view @Model.Calculations.CalculatePrice I get the intellisense warning that "cannot convert method group...", so I add the () and try different parameters price and filing to no avail (error is they don't exist in current context). Is there any way to avoid passing parameters? I'd be passing a bunch of parameters (10 models). –  REMESQ May 24 '12 at 6:02
    
Gonna offer bounty to you first. –  REMESQ May 24 '12 at 6:02
    
OK, I've added some more code/clarity there. HTH. –  RJ Lohan May 24 '12 at 9:48
    
Thanks for the help. I've reworked everything to account for static (thanks for that suggestion, btw). Now I am just struggling with calling this in the view. I'm trying variations on @Calculations.CalculatePrice with parenthesis, without, with parameter, without, etc. Something silly I am not doing, I know. Also took out references to PriceQuote and Calculations from my ViewModel. –  REMESQ May 24 '12 at 13:53
    
I THINK IT'S SOLVED! I'm going to edit your code a bit. If you can, please confirm if this is ok to do. I suspect it's not the right way, but it works. If not, I'd appreciate any alternative suggestions. It's saying I can't award bounty for 14 hours. Going to mark as answer - I think that automatically gives you bounty later. –  REMESQ May 24 '12 at 15:35

Have you really got this bit of code:

public decimal calculatingTest(MyModel MyModel)
{ ... }

rather than this?

public decimal calculatingTest(MyModel myModel) // note the difference in case.
{ ... }

Only that sort of thing can make life really complicated.

share|improve this answer
1  
Concur; it's quite confusing - especially with partial code snippets - to determine the problem. There could be static fields in there confusing things. –  RJ Lohan May 21 '12 at 23:05
    
Exactly. I've met that sort of problem in the past when debugging somebody else's code. –  Tom Chantler May 21 '12 at 23:07
    
@RJLohan Trying not to have too large a post (clearly I have not succeeded). I updated the code. Sorry, not sure what would be relevant. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 1:50
    
I recall confusing myself with this issue. When I did MyModel myModel = new MyModel(); at the top MyProperty would not work. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 1:52

Have you tried debugging through to ensure that MyModel.MyModelProperty really does equal "No" at runtime?

If it is, perhaps you need to override the equality operator (i.e. perhaps the "==" test is failing) - see MSDN article here for a tutorial:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173147(v=vs.80).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
I was debugging and switching "No" and "Yes" and never even saw the "Yes". So if my controller is not mocking the data before the model calculation is called that would seem to be my problem. Now to try and figure out how to fix. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 1:54

In your Calculations class, you are getting '100' as a return value not because

MyModel.MyProperty == MyModel.MyPropertyEnum.Yes

but because it doesn't equal MyModel.MyPropertyEnum.No. So your if block is just falling to the default case. In this code snipped, MyModel.MyProperty has no value assigned, so it just takes the default, which from what I can tell is;

(MyPropertyEnum?)null

The 'not all code paths return a value' exception is due to the fact you have made MyProperty a nullable type and not provided an outcome for;

MyModel.MyProperty == null

And again, your use of type names as variable names is a poor choice. You have a class instance variable called 'MyModel' in Calculations.cs and a method argument called MyModel in calculatingTest. It is confusing.

And lastly, the reason for your StackOverflowException is that you are recursively calling calculatingTest with the same argument, so it gets into an infinite loop.

There's quite a few issues here which you can clean up and you'll probably find the cause of your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Ok, cleaned up my code a bit. I am assigning a value in the controller for MyProperty: MyViewModel myViewModel = new MyViewModel(); { MyModel = new Models.MyModel { MyProperty = Models.MyModel.MyPropertyEnum.No } } So it's clear that although I am assigning in controller, the model is getting called first and not picking up the assignment. Is there particular code I need in the controller (I posted what I had in the controller in my original question). As for not providing for an outcome for null I was hoping I wouldn't have to if I got the code right, but will research that independently. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 12:13
    
Just for clarity, my controller is just mocking data while I test out this stuff. It's not permanent. The use case is user input on a form, so that the values they select will be the ones used to calculate. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 12:14
    
Can you clean up the example code in your post? Also, I don't see how the type 'MyViewModel' is used anywhere, or what relevance it has to your question. –  RJ Lohan May 22 '12 at 20:21
    
Rephrased/cleaned up code. Thanks. –  REMESQ May 22 '12 at 22:15
    
I've added a 2nd answer to reflect the changes you made to your original post. –  RJ Lohan May 22 '12 at 23:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.