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I need a little program which:

  1. Reads natural number n
  2. then reads n real numbers r0,r1,r2,...,rn
  3. then reads another real number x

And then prints the size of x in percentiles in relation to the numbers r0,r1,r2,...,rn

    #include<stdio.h>


int main(){

int n, i=0;
double r[1000], x;

printf("Enter how many numbers\n");
scanf("%i", &n);

printf("Enter numbers\n");
while(i<n){
    scanf("%lf", &r[i]);
    i++;
    }

printf("Enter x:\n");
scanf("%lf", &x);
// need part here
// where percentiles are calculated

}

So here is my problem, how the hell i can calculate that percentiles? I've read a lot of about percentiles and still I don't understand that, so maybe someone will explain it to me what i need to do, or just show me a pattern how to calculate that percentiles. I know C language a bit so i can write alone if some1 explain it to me how i can calculate percentiles ;o

P.S. about percentiles from wikipedia

In statistics, a percentile (or centile) is the value of a variable below which a certain percent of observations fall. For example, the 20th percentile is the value (or score) below which 20 percent of the observations may be found. The 25th percentile is also known as the first quartile (Q1), the 50th percentile as the median or second quartile (Q2), and the 75th percentile as the third quartile (Q3).

EDIT: Okay everything works (I think), but i have 1 more question: My code looks that

#include<stdio.h>

void sortowanie( double r[1000], int n){
    int i,j;
    double temp;
    for(i=0; i<n; i++)
        for(j=0;j<n-1; j++){
            if (r[j]>r[j+1]){
                temp=r[j+1];
                r[j+1]=r[j];
                r[j]=temp;
                }

            }
}

int centyl(double x, int n){
int temp, wynik;
temp=n-x;
wynik=100*temp/n;
return wynik;

}


int main(){

int n, i=0;
double r[1000], x;

printf("Enter how many numbers\n");
scanf("%i", &n);

printf("Enter numbers\n");
while(i<n){
    scanf("%lf", &r[i]);
    i++;
    }

printf("Enter x:\n");
scanf("%lf", &x);

sortowanie(r, n);

printf("Centyl to %i\n", centyl(x, n) );

return 0;
}

And want to know what protection can I do to don't break that program? Are there any protections which I can make here?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Makoto, Jack Maney, Martijn Pieters, Mitch Dempsey, abatishchev May 22 '12 at 8:35

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
This is more concerning the math portion, not the programming portion. Wiki and statistics books are your best friend in this arena. –  Makoto May 21 '12 at 22:59
1  
Unless I'm misunderstanding the question (or what a percentile is), you need to count the number of values < x, count the total number of values (which you already have in n) then just find the ratio of less than x to total. (less/n) –  Corbin May 21 '12 at 22:59
    
The whole point of having the user pass in n is so that you'll know how large to make your array. –  Sam Dufel May 21 '12 at 23:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is more math related and more appropriate for the Mathematics forum. However, I'll save you the trouble since the thread is already here.

To find the percentile of anything just consider the following:

If you came 25th out of class of 200 students, then you did better than 175 of them. To find your percentile, you would divide the number of students you did better than by the total number of students.

For example:

1. 200 - 25 = 175

2. 175 / 200 = 87.5 = 88th Percentile

That's a very simplified way to find the percentile - it's easy to understand and always works. I hope this helps you.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you a lot :) –  Sebastian Stasiak May 21 '12 at 23:16

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