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This is just a sample, but it will help illustrate what I'm trying to do.

I know how to get the current directory as shown in the script below, and I can can set a file variable.

The problem I'm having is that I can't figure out how to make it create a folder and put the file in the folder

For example (using the variables below)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var cd = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();
            Directory.CreateDirectory(cd: \5app\);
            File.Copy(c:\xyz.txt, cd: \5app\xyz.txt

        }
    }
}

I know what I have written above is not correct because vs10 tells me so, but doesn't give me very much help.

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4  
I would recommend looking at MSDN's documentation for this. It appears that you have just found this function and started throwing parameters at it. If you look at the example in the documentation you will have a good starting point for what you are trying to do. –  Abe Miessler May 21 '12 at 23:24
    
@abe-meissler This. I included links to the specific MSDN articles for the functions CreateDirectory and Copy in my answer... –  EtherDragon May 22 '12 at 16:50
    
It would be nice to accept an answer now. –  Cole Johnson Sep 29 '13 at 0:07
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3 Answers

You're missing a parenthesis and a semicolon, and, especially, arguments of methods Directory.CreateDirectory() and File.Copy() are strings, put them inside quotes:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var cd = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();
            Directory.CreateDirectory(cd + @"\5app\");
            File.Copy(@"c:\xyz.txt", cd + @"\5app\xyz.txt");
        }
    }
}

MSDN references: Directory.CreateDirectory, File.Copy

Thanks to Cole Johnson for pointing out that it shouldn't be @"cd: \5app\".

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1  
Cd: doesn't go in quotes. It's a parameter name for explicit parameters –  Cole Johnson May 21 '12 at 23:25
    
thank you, I've fixed it –  Nadir Sampaoli May 21 '12 at 23:29
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You don't use quotes.

In addition, I recommend against explicit parameter naming. If you look at the CIL generated when using explicit parameters, there is a performance downgrade as the parameter variables are saved to a local variable, then passed. This results in an unneeded strfld command.

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1  
also close your File.Copy(c:\xyz.txt, cd: \5app\xyz.txt statement –  Adam Sweeney May 21 '12 at 23:22
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There are several problems with your code, which Compiler Errors will likely help you to unravel:

The method Directory.CreateDirectory(string path) requires a string, which is encased in "". Here is an MSDN article on how to use Directory.CreateDirectory

Same with the method File.Copy(string source, string destination) Here is an MSDN article on how to use File.Copy

Since Directory.GetDirectory() returns a string, you can just concatinate your specific directory to the result. But remember to use proper Escape Sequences in your strings for things like Backslash.

namespace ConsoleApplication1 
{ 
    class Program 
    { 
        static void Main(string[] args) 
        { 
            string cd = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(); 
            Directory.CreateDirectory(cd + "\\5app\\"); 
            File.Copy("c:\\xyz.txt", cd + "\\5app\\xyz.txt");
        } 
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
thank you.... i see where my errors were. –  Spdwiz18 May 22 '12 at 2:29
    
@user1408958 If one of these posts is your answer, please be sure to mark it. –  EtherDragon May 22 '12 at 21:03
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