Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
keyword harry /
sally/
tally/

want that whenever the string matches with keyword it should also look for "/" character.This signifies continuation of line

Then I want output as

keyword harry sally tally 
==========================

My current code:

#!/usr/bin/perl
open (file2, "trial.txt");

$keyword_1 = keyword;
foreach $line1 (<file2>) {
  s/^\s+|\s+$//g;
  if ($line1 =~ $keyword_1)    {
    $line2 =~ (s/$\//g, $line1) ;
    print " $line2 " ;
  }
}
share|improve this question
    
Provide more complex input and expected output, please. People will be more able to help you if they understand what you are trying to do. –  matthias krull May 22 '12 at 8:57
    
@Adam: you say in a later comment that the input lines are terminated by backslashes. You should update your question to reflect this. –  Borodin May 23 '12 at 11:26

4 Answers 4

If the ===== lines in your question are supposed to be in the output, then use

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

*ARGV = *DATA;  # for demo only; delete

sub print_line {
  my($line) = @_;
  $line =~ s/\n$//;  # / fix Stack Overflow highlighting
  print $line, "\n",
        "=" x (length($line) + 1), "\n";
}

my $line = "";
while (<>) {
  $line .= $line =~ /^$|[ \t]$/ ? $_ : " $_";

  if ($line !~ s!/\n$!!) {  # / ditto
    print_line $line;
    $line = "";
  }
}

print_line $line if length $line;

__DATA__
keyword jim-bob
keyword harry /
sally/
tally/

Output:

keyword jim-bob
================
keyword harry sally tally
==========================
share|improve this answer
    
I like the *ARGV = *DATA trick, never thought of that one before. –  Joel Berger May 22 '12 at 14:14
    
@Joel Thanks. I've found it to be effective for creating self-contained demos in Stack Overflow answers. –  Greg Bacon May 22 '12 at 14:43
    
Well I have used DATA for this reason before of course, but aliasing it to ARGV is nice because you can use the <> operator on it. Very clever. –  Joel Berger May 22 '12 at 21:20
    
@Joel I'm glad you appreciate the intended benefit. Go thou and do likewise. –  Greg Bacon May 22 '12 at 21:24

You did not specify what to do with the lines that do not contain the keyword. You might use this code as an inspiration, though:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my $on_keyword_line;
while (<>) {
    if (/keyword/ or $on_keyword_line) {
        chomp;

        if (m{/$}) {
            chop;
            $on_keyword_line = 1;

        } else {
            $on_keyword_line = 0;

        }
        print;

    } else {
        $on_keyword_line = 0;
        print "\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
well all the lines have some or the other keyword.I am using VI as editor. So, whenever in a line i get across a "/" i need to ignore it and append the next line till it sees the next keyword. Like it sees the keyword and then sees Harry / so here it needs to ignore that/ and bring sally on the line harry was and also bring tally remove the / and bring tally also on the line of Harry meaning making one line having all harry sally tally –  adam May 22 '12 at 0:01
    
I am thankful to you @choroba –  adam May 22 '12 at 0:04

A redo is useful when dealing with concatenating continuation lines.

my $line;
while ( defined( $line = <DATA> )) {
    chomp $line;
    if ( $line =~ s{/\s*$}{ } ) {
        $line .= <DATA>;
        redo unless eof(DATA);
    }
    $line =~ s{/}{};
    print "$line\n";
}
__DATA__
keyword harry /
sally/
tally/
and
done!!!

$ ./test.pl
keyword harry  sally tally and
done!!!
share|improve this answer
    
Thankful to everyone but when i am trying your codes none of yours is working ... actually just want to get rid of backslashes and whtever lines are ending with backslashes i want them to merge after identifying a particular keyword.So after identification of keywords sometimes commands are big and one needs to put backslashes so as to signify that command is continuing .. so ten as soon as backslash comes one needs to just igonore it and merge all lines ending with it till it finds next keyword –  adam May 22 '12 at 21:03
    
foreach $line1 (<file2>) { chomp $line1; @array1 = $line1 ; if ($line1 =~ $keyword) { while($line1 =~ /\\/) { $line1 =~ s/\\//; } print "$line1 \n" ; } } –  adam May 22 '12 at 21:08
    
@Adam: You have been getting non-working solutions because your question describes the input as terminating on slashes. Now that we know it is really backslashes we can help you properly. I have updated my answer to reflect this. –  Borodin May 23 '12 at 11:25

I think you need to simply concatenate all lines that end in a slash, regardless of the keyword.

I suggest this code.

Updated to account for the OP's comment that continuation lines are terminated by backslashes.

while (<>) {
  s|\\\s*\z||;
  print;
}
share|improve this answer
    
this is not working :( but thanks for your help –  adam May 22 '12 at 21:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.