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I have a database which is including two tables, Labs and LabUsers How do I join a column from LabUsers into a cell in Labs.

To be specific, I would like to have the user names of a lab to be concatenated and separated with a bullet ( • is Alt+0149), and to have these usernames sorted alphabetically left to right.

Here is an example.

The Labs table looks like this:

LabID  LabName     LabStudents
-----  ----------  -----------
1      North       NULL
2      North East  NULL
3      South West  NULL

and the LabUsers looks like this:

LabUserID   LabUserName   LabID
---------   -----------   -----    
1           Diana         1
2           Paul          2
3           Paula         2
4           Romeo         1
5           Julia         1
6           Rose          2
7           Diana         2

I would like to get this outcome in the Labs table:

LabID  LabName     LabUsers
-----  ----------  ---------------------
1      North       Diana•Julia•Romeo
2      North East  Diana•Paul•Paula•Rose
3      South West  NULL

Here is the script to create the tables:

USE [tempdb];
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LabUsers]
(
    [LabUserID] [int] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
    [LabUserName] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [LabID] [int] NOT NULL
);
GO
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 1, N'Diana', 1;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 2, N'Paul',  2;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 3, N'Paula', 2;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 4, N'Romeo', 1;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 5, N'Julia', 1;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 6, N'Rose',  2;
INSERT [dbo].[LabUsers] SELECT 7, N'Diana', 2;

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[Labs]
(
    [LabID] [int] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED,
    [LabName] [nvarchar](50) NOT NULL,
    [LabUsers] [nvarchar](max) NULL
);
GO
INSERT [dbo].[Labs] SELECT 1, N'North',      NULL;
INSERT [dbo].[Labs] SELECT 2, N'North East', NULL;
INSERT [dbo].[Labs] SELECT 3, N'South West', NULL;
share|improve this question
    
Any reason you can't do this in code? – Abe Miessler May 21 '12 at 23:31
    
Abe Miessler- I do. But I would like to have it as a stored procedure due to collisions. – Different111222 May 21 '12 at 23:40
up vote 2 down vote accepted
SELECT l.LabID, l.LabName, LabUsers = STUFF((SELECT N'•' + lu.LabUserName
  FROM dbo.LabUsers AS lu 
  WHERE lu.LabID = l.LabID
  ORDER BY lu.LabUserName
  FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE).value('.', 'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, '')
FROM dbo.Labs AS l;

I see absolutely no reason to store this in the table, since you can always generate the code at runtime when you run a query. If you store it in the table, then you have to update it every single time you change any row in the table.

However, if I can't convince you not to do this (it really is bad to store redundant data like this), you can try this way:

;WITH x AS
(
    SELECT l.LabID, l.LabName, x = STUFF((SELECT N'•' + lu.LabUserName
      FROM dbo.LabUsers AS lu 
      WHERE lu.LabID = l.LabID
      ORDER BY lu.LabUserName
      FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE).value('.', 'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, '')
    FROM dbo.Labs AS l
)
UPDATE l
SET LabUsers = x.x
FROM dbo.Labs AS l
INNER JOIN x ON l.LabID = x.LabID;

As for the performance tests, I'd compare the above version with this variation:

SELECT l.LabID, l.LabName, LabUsers = STUFF((SELECT N'•' + lu.LabUserName
  FROM dbo.LabUsers AS lu 
  WHERE lu.LabID = l.LabID
  ORDER BY lu.LabUserName
  FOR XML PATH('')), 1, 1, '')
FROM dbo.Labs AS l;

On my system I see the initial version at the top of this answer to be far more expensive. Also note that stuffing (no pun intended) these approaches into a user-defined function will bring it closer to the concatenation method @RThomas proposed.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually a pretty common pattern to a frequently asked question. This FOR XML PATH subquery works like GROUP_CONCAT in MySQL - for each value of LabID it builds up a string consisting of each lab user found. – Aaron Bertrand May 21 '12 at 23:47
    
Curious how my answer performs compared to yours... I've used the coalesce approach several times but MVPs like yourself seem to always like the xml path approach. – RThomas May 21 '12 at 23:50
    
@RThomas well, you can always compare them. :-) I suspect the UDF called per row will add some overhead as well. – Aaron Bertrand May 21 '12 at 23:57
    
Good point ;-) just me trying to access the RAM in your head as opposed to the disk I/O available to mine. But I am curious so I will. – RThomas May 21 '12 at 23:59
1  
@RThomas thanks for the confirmation. Then again, the difference you highlight might be largely irrelevant until you get into very large datasets, and particularly with a one-time operation. – Aaron Bertrand May 22 '12 at 0:28

Give this a try

SELECT  LabName ,
        STUFF(( SELECT  ',' + LabUsers.LabUserName
                FROM    dbo.LabUsers
                WHERE   LabUsers.LabID = Labs.LabID
                ORDER BY LabName
              FOR
                XML PATH('')
              ), 1, 1, '') AS Labusers
FROM    dbo.Labs
ORDER BY LabName

The FOR XML PATH('') concatenates your strings together into one XML result and the STUFF puts a "nothing" character at the first character, e.g. wipes out the unneeded first comma.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for you too since it was roughly the same approach as accepted. – RThomas May 22 '12 at 0:25

Another way to do it is set up a UDF that returns all the lab users as a single string like this:

CREATE FUNCTION LabUserString
(
@pLabId Int
)
RETURNS NVarChar(Max)
AS
BEGIN

  Declare @pResult NVarChar(Max)

  SELECT @pResult = COALESCE(@pResult + N'•', '') + [LabUserName] 
  FROM LabUsers WHERE LabId = @pLabId

  Return @pResult

END

And then a query like this:

Select LabID, LabName, dbo.LabUserString(LabID) AS LabUsers FROM Labs
share|improve this answer
    
I'll leave the answer for posterity, but my own tests showed the accepted answer to perform better. Quite a bit actually. – RThomas May 22 '12 at 0:25

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