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I want to do some logging while executing my JUnit test. In JUnit 3.x it was always easy to obtain the name of the currently running test case, no matter how the test case was instantiated:

public void testFoo() throws Exception() {
  String testName = this.getName();
  // [...] do some stuff
}

In JUnit 4 things seem to be not so easy. Does anyone know a solution to this? Is there any option to reflect into the current Runner instance?

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marked as duplicate by rgettman, Achrome, Orangepill, jcern, alecxe May 29 '13 at 22:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
Seems similar to: stackoverflow.com/questions/473401/… –  Grzegorz Oledzki Jul 1 '09 at 19:40
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

OK. I've found another approach somewhere on the Internet:

    @RunWith(Interceptors.class) 
    public class NameTest { 
            @Interceptor public TestName name = new TestName(); 

            @Test public void funnyName() { 
                    assertEquals("funnyName", name.getMethodName()); 
            } 
    }
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That seems exactly in the direction I was looking for. I'll give it a try tomorrow. –  mkoeller Jul 1 '09 at 17:57
    
Unfortunately, this solution is only going to be released in the upcoming final version of JUnit 4.7 . Meanwhile I'm forced to stick with an earlier version that's included in the customer's framework architecture. However, this is the best answer to the question. –  mkoeller Jul 2 '09 at 8:50
    
Where is this Interceptors class? I don't see it in the 4.11 Javadoc –  Peter Tseng Dec 14 '12 at 6:04
    
@Peter The answer using the Rule annotation is what is in junit now. –  sMoZely Apr 1 '13 at 8:39
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What's wrong with:

@Test
public void foo() throws Exception() {
   String testName = this.getName();
   // [...] do some stuff
}

?

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In JUnit 4 the test classes no longer extend a common framework class. So there's no inherited method getName any more. –  mkoeller Jul 1 '09 at 14:59
    
OK. I still don't get what is the `this.getName() about. How is it different than this.getClass().getName()? (I've found another answer for you) –  Grzegorz Oledzki Jul 1 '09 at 15:51
1  
In JUnit 3, TestCase.getName() returns the name of the test method. When you run a JUnit3 test case, multiple instances of your test class are created, each with a different name. See junit.sourceforge.net/doc/cookstour/cookstour.htm –  NamshubWriter Jul 7 '09 at 5:12
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In JUnit 4.7, you can also get the name of the currently executed thest method. May be nice when logging.

Taken from JUnit 4.7 Release Notes (read them here at github) :

public class NameRuleTest {
    @Rule public TestName name = new TestName();

	@Test public void testA() {
		assertEquals("testA", name.getMethodName());
	}

	@Test public void testB() {
		assertEquals("testB", name.getMethodName());
	}
}
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public class FooTest {
    @Rule
    final public TestRule traceTestWatcher = new TestWatcher() {
        @Override
        protected void starting(Description d) {
            System.out.println(d);
        }
    };

    @Test
    public void testBar() {
        ...
    }

    @Test
    public void testBaz() {
        ...
    }
}
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I know this is old, but here is a useful (non-junit) method that I put at the top of all my tests.

public static void printTestName(){
    final StackTraceElement[] ste = new Throwable().getStackTrace();
    int buffer = 35 - ste[1].getMethodName().length();
    System.out.println("*******************************************************");
    System.out.println("*            TEST:  " + ste[1].getMethodName() + getBuffer(buffer) + "*");
    System.out.println("*******************************************************");
}

private static String getBuffer(int offset){
    StringBuilder buffer = new StringBuilder("");
    for(int i = 1; i < offset; i++){
        buffer.append(" ");
    }
    return buffer.toString();
}
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