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Random r = new Random();
List<object> myList = new List<object>();

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
  myList.Add(new { A = r.Next(), B = r.Next() });

myList.Sort( (obj1, obj2) => obj1.A.CompareTo(obj2.A) );

The above code defines a generic List an populates it with 100 anonymous variables with two members, A and B.

Let's say I want to sort myList on A. The final line attempts to sort the list, however this code clearly doesn't compile because the compiler doesn't know what the list of objects contains.

Without using LINQ, is it possible to somehow sort this list using a lambda or similar?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It is possible to sort it without LINQ, as long as you manage to declare your list as that of a List of objects of anonymous type using the var syntax, or are willing to use dynamic:

Random r = new Random();
List<dynamic> myList = new List<object>();

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    myList.Add(new { A = r.Next(), B = r.Next() });

myList.Sort( (obj1, obj2) => obj1.A.CompareTo(obj2.A) );
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You didn't say that at first, but now you edited it in. :-) –  Jason May 22 '12 at 1:31
    
@Jason I re-read the answer, and realized that the first part might be confusing, so I mentioned var. –  dasblinkenlight May 22 '12 at 1:33
    
+1. To use strongly typed version see my answer (requires helper method to my knowledge) –  Alexei Levenkov May 22 '12 at 1:35

First, you can use LINQ if you use implicit typing very carefully:

var myList = Enumerable.Range(0, 100)
                       .Select(index => new { A = r.Next(), B = r.Next() })
                       .ToList();
myList.Sort( (obj1, obj2) => obj1.A.CompareTo(obj2.A) );

Second, if you're willing to use dynamic, type the list as a List<dynamic> and then you can use LINQ directly.

However, I really don't see why you insist on being glued to anonymous types. Just make a nominal type and bask in the glory that is strong-typing, compile-time safety, and LINQ!

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There is no magic in LINQ - you can look at all method signatures and see how types get figured out.

You want something like this to create list of your type (similar of ToList() extension):

List<T> NewList<T>(T ignored)
{
    return new List<T>();
}

and use it as

Random r = new Random();
var myList = NewList(new { A = r.Next(), B = r.Next() });

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
  myList.Add(new { A = r.Next(), B = r.Next() });

myList.Sort( (obj1, obj2) => obj1.A.CompareTo(obj2.A) );
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