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Take this dataset...

test <- data.frame(
    t1=c(2,3,5,6,7,10,10),
    t2=c(3,4,6,7,8,11,12),
    id=1:7
)

...which looks like this. To clarify, each row is a previously identified link of two cases that have to stay bound together.

  t1 t2 id
1  2  3  1
2  3  4  2
3  5  6  3
4  6  7  4
5  7  8  5
6 10 11  6
7 10 12  7

I am hoping to identify the continuous sequences based on t2 == t1 recursively so that the links are:

link1 -  2-3,3-4
link2 -  5-6,6-7,7-8
link3 -  10-11
link4 -  10-12

The end result i'm looking for is this:

  t1 t2 id matchid
1  2  3  1       1
2  3  4  2       1
3  5  6  3       2
4  6  7  4       2
5  7  8  5       2
6 10 11  6       3
7 10 12  7       4

I have experimented with match(test$t2,test$t1) to get the initial links but am now getting stuck on how to continue the linking process. My thoughts keep falling back to using a loop and that sounds like a terrible way to go.

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a suggestion. why don't you offset t2 downwards by 1, then all the ones with same numbers for t1 and t2 would belong to the same id. –  JackeJR May 22 '12 at 3:18
    
@RJ- see my clarification - the t1/t2 combinations in each row are tied together and can't be moved independently of one another. –  thelatemail May 22 '12 at 3:23
1  
i understand. the move is temporary to facilitate the checking. the idea is to offset, check and generate a new column to indicate if the t1 == t2. So say i use YES to indicate t1 == t2 and NO to indicate t1 != t2. After which i use run length encoding (rle) to determine the run length and use that to generate an increasing id based on the rle. After all that is done, the offset can be reversed. –  JackeJR May 22 '12 at 3:28
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1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Here is one way to do it:

test$matchid <- c(1, 1 + cumsum(tail(test$t1, -1) != head(test$t2, -1)))
share|improve this answer
    
That is flipping brilliant, but you're going to have to explain it to a dunderhead like me. –  thelatemail May 22 '12 at 3:32
2  
hehe, just take it one step at a time. I suggest you start and type tail(test$t1, -1) to see what it returns, then head(test$t2, -1), then compare them with !=, etc. You'll see it is not that difficult. –  flodel May 22 '12 at 3:37
    
brilliant indeed! much better than i could think of. –  JackeJR May 22 '12 at 3:42
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