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Is there a more efficient way to do what is going on below? I would very much like to think there is. There is no particular use to this script, but it would still be very nice to know a more efficient way to do what this.

# Divides text into 10 lists.. you'll see what I mean.
# 5/21/2012

filename = "test.txt"

FILE = open(filename,"r")

# READ FILE WORD-BY-WORD:
f = open(filename,"r")
lines = f.readlines()
for i in lines:
    thisline = i.split(" ")

FILE.close()

# DIVIDE INTO 10 LISTS:
list1 = []
list2 = []
list3 = []
list4 = []
list5 = []
list6 = []
list7 = []
list8 = []
list9 = []
list10 = []

j = 0
while j < len(thisline):
    x = thisline[j]
    list1.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list2.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list3.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list4.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list5.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list6.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list7.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list8.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list9.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

    x = thisline[j]
    list10.append(x)
    j+=1
    if j >= len(thisline):
        break

print "list 1 = "," ".join(list1)
print "list 2 = "," ".join(list2)
print "list 3 = "," ".join(list3)
print "list 4 = "," ".join(list4)
print "list 5 = "," ".join(list5)
print "list 6 = "," ".join(list6)
print "list 7 = "," ".join(list7)
print "list 8 = "," ".join(list8)
print "list 9 = "," ".join(list9)
print "list 10 = "," ".join(list10)

# EOF
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3  
Yes there is definitely a more elegant way, it would make it easier for people if you posted example input and output as well. –  jamylak May 22 '12 at 5:21
1  
Note that thisline is the always last line in the file. I'm not sure this is what you intended. –  Joel Cornett May 22 '12 at 5:35

3 Answers 3

If what this program is meant to do is to read the lines of a file, break them into words and then append the the words to the lists such that the Nth list contains every 10th word starting with the Nth, then that is what the following does:

from itertools import izip, cycle

filename = "test.txt"
f = open(filename,"r")

lsts = list([] for _ in range(10))
oracle = cycle(lsts)

for line in f:
    parts = line.split(" ")

    for lst, part in izip(oracle, parts):
        lst.append(part)

f.close()

for index, lst in enumerate(lsts):
    print "list %u = " % (index+1,)," ".join(lst)
share|improve this answer
    
If you are doing what the OP wants, then you are doing so correctly. OP? –  sberry May 22 '12 at 6:04
    
I think you shouldn't create a new cycle(lsts) for each line. Shouldn't it carry on where it leaves off? –  gnibbler May 22 '12 at 6:21
    
D'oh, yes, it should. –  Dan D. May 22 '12 at 6:22

This pads the shorter lists with None, you can easily filter those out if you please

with open("test.txt") as f:
    result = zip(*map(None, *[(word for line in f for word in line.split())]*10))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 -- that is an awesome statement –  dawg May 22 '12 at 6:52

If you have a file with ten lines of entry, this will work:

line1, line2, line3, line4, line5, line6, line7, line8, line9, line10 = open('test.txt','r').readlines()

You can replace the open().readlines() call with any function that does the splitting you require. Showing us an example of your input file would help with this.

However, why use 10 variables when you could use an indexed sequence?

lines = open('test.txt', 'r').readlines()
assert line1 == lines[0] # etc
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