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There is the command hierarchy in my current application.

public interface ICommand
{
    void Execute();
}

So, some commands are stateful, some are not.

I need to enumerate IEnumerable in the circular way for some command implementation during command execution.

public class GetNumberCommand : ICommand
{
    public GetNumberCommand()
    {
        List<int> numbers = new List<int>
            {
                1, 2, 3
            };
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        // Circular iteration here.
        // 1 => 2 => 3 => 1 => 2 => 3 => ...
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        // Log current value. (2 for example)
    }
}

Execute is called from time to time, so it is necessary to store the iteration state.

How to implement that circular enumeration?

I have found two solutions:

  1. Using the IEnumerator<T> interface. It looks like:

    if (!_enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        _enumerator.Reset();
        _enumerator.MoveNext();
    }
    
  2. Using the circular IEnumerable<T> (yield forever the same sequence): Implementing A Circular Iterator.

Maybe there are more ways to achieve it. What would you recommend to use and why?

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4 Answers 4

Instead of dealing with IEnumerator interface,

foreach (var x in GetSomething())
{
     if (someCondition) break;
}



public IEnumerable<int> GetSomething()
{
    List<int> list = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 };
    int index=0;

    while (true)
        yield return list[index++ % list.Count];
}
share|improve this answer
    
I think you will get overflow on index very soon if do like that –  Eugene Petrov May 22 '12 at 6:22
    
In my case, Execute is called from time to time, so it is necessary to store the iteration state. –  Sergey Brunov May 22 '12 at 6:24
    
see my solution in the end. you can store index in the collection and pass it to iterator –  Eugene Petrov May 22 '12 at 6:25
    
Okay, I see the point. Out of curiosity, how about IEnumerable<T> (not List<T>)? –  Sergey Brunov May 22 '12 at 6:52
    
I used List only for example, you can use whatever you want :) My example is very ugly and not for production code. It was just being used to show the idea. –  Eugene Petrov May 22 '12 at 7:05
while (!stop)
{
   foreach (var i in numbers)
   {
     // do something
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In my case, Execute is called from time to time, so it is necessary to store the iteration state. –  Sergey Brunov May 22 '12 at 6:24

I think, the most comfortable way wil be to implement custom collection with custom enumerator and encapsulate circular logic in it.

class Collection<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
  bool circle;

  List<T> collection = new List<T>();

  public IEnumerable<T> IEnumerable<T>.GetEnumerator()
  {
     if(circle) return new CustomEnumerator<T>(this);
     return circle.GetEnumerator();
  }
}

class CustomEnumerator : Enumerator<T> {}

something like this...

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You can write a circular enumerable without yield returns.

  public class CircularEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
  {
    public CircularEnumerable (IEnumerable<T> sequence)
    {
      InfiniteLoop = sequence.Concat (this);
    }

    private readonly IEnumerable<T> InfiniteLoop;

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator ()
    {
      return InfiniteLoop.GetEnumerator ();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator ()
    {
      return InfiniteLoop.GetEnumerator ();
    }
  }

public class GetNumberCommand : ICommand
{
    public GetNumberCommand()
    {
        List<int> numbers = new List<int>
            {
                1, 2, 3
            };
        infiniteLoopOnNumbers = new CircularEnumerable<int>(numbers).GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator<int> infiniteLoopOnNumbers; 

    public void Execute()
    {
        infiniteLoopOnNumbers.MoveNext();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        int value = infiniteLoopOnNumbers.Current;
    }
}
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