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I don't need to write this in jQuery but I'm not versed enough in plain javascript to figure it out. Chris Coyier wrote a nice explanation of what I'm talking about here.

The reason I want to convert it is because I don't need to include an entire jQuery library for this one piece of code. I can save that extra request by using plain old javascript.

This is the example code that I want to convert:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(".featured").click(function(){
        window.location=$(this).find("a").attr("href"); return false;
    });
});

Here's what I've come up with so far:

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function() {
    document.querySelectorAll("div.feature").click(function(){
        window.location=$(this).find("a").setAttribute("href"); 
        return false;
    });
});

One thing which isn't correct in this, as far as I know, are the querySelectorAll, which is looking for just a div element, right? The other thing is the $(this), which I don't know how to translate into plain javascript.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can select with this.querySelectorAll(...):

IE8:

window.onload = function() {
    // get all dom elements with class "feature"
    var aFeatures = document.querySelectorAll(".feature");
    // for each selected element
    for (var i = 0; i < aFeatures.length; i++) {
        // add click handler
        aFeatures[i].onclick = function() {
            // get href of first anchor in element and change location
            window.location = this.querySelectorAll("a")[0].href;
            return false;
        };
    }
};

IE9 and other current browser:

document.addEventListener("DOMContentLoaded", function() {
    // get all dom elements with class "feature"
    var aFeatures = document.querySelectorAll(".feature");
    // for each selected element
    for (var i = 0; i < aFeatures.length; i++) {
        // add click handler
        aFeatures[i].addEventListener('click', function() {
            // get href of first anchor in element and change location
            window.location = this.querySelectorAll("a")[0].href;
            return false;
        });
    }
});

=== UPDATE ===

For IE7 support you should add following (untested) script before (also see here):

(function(d){d=document,a=d.styleSheets[0]||d.createStyleSheet();d.querySelectorAll=function(e){a.addRule(e,'f:b');for(var l=d.all,b=0,c=[],f=l.length;b<f;b++)l[b].currentStyle.f&&c.push(l[b]);a.removeRule(0);return c}})()

It is possible that it only supports document.querySelectorAll not element.querySelectorAll.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to add IE7 support using javascript alone? Otherwise, I'll have to see if I can get the client live with IE7 functioning differently. –  micah May 22 '12 at 6:53
1  
btw, I tested it and the IE8 version works for all browsers too. But it's great that you included both methods considering some people will drop support for IE8 in the future. –  micah May 22 '12 at 6:58

Assuming...

  • you know the browser support for querySelectorAll and yet you still use it
  • that addEventListener only works for standards compliant browsers

I believe you meant:

//get all a's inside divs that have class "featured"
var feat = document.querySelectorAll("div.featured a"),
    featlen = feat.length,
    i;

//loop through each
for(i=0;i<featlen;++i){
    //add listeners to each
    feat[i].addEventListener('click',function(){
        window.location = this.href;
    },false);
}

Or you can have the <div> wrapped in <a>. No JS required. It's perfectly valid HTML and browsers do work as intended despite the rule that inline elements should not contain block elements. Just make sure to have display:block on <a> as well as adjust its size.

<a href="location">
    <div> content </div>
</a>
share|improve this answer
    
@muistooshort thanks, i missed that one. –  Joseph the Dreamer May 22 '12 at 6:11
1  
That's why we look at each other's code :) –  mu is too short May 22 '12 at 6:12
    
Oh no, querySelectorAll isn't supported by IE7. Darn. Is there a way around that problem? I also find it interesting that it's not as easy as translating the original jQuery into javascript as it is written. –  micah May 22 '12 at 6:47

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