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If I have a JavaScript object such as:

var list = {"you": 100, "me": 75, "foo": 116, "bar": 15};

is there a way to sort the properties based on value? So that I end up with

list = {"bar": 15, "me": 75, "you": 100, "foo": 116};

I'm having a real brain-dead moment regarding this.

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2  
Not only "sorting," but more importantly sorting numbers. Numbers are immune to Javascripts Array.sort() method, meaning you'll not just have to find a method for sorting properties, but you'll have to write your own function to compare the numerical values. –  Jonathan Sampson Jul 1 '09 at 15:12

11 Answers 11

up vote 167 down vote accepted

Move them to an array, sort that array, and then use that array for your purposes.

Here's a solution I found via Google:

var maxSpeed = {car:300, bike:60, motorbike:200, airplane:1000,
    helicopter:400, rocket:8*60*60}
var sortable = [];
for (var vehicle in maxSpeed)
      sortable.push([vehicle, maxSpeed[vehicle]])
sortable.sort(function(a, b) {return a[1] - b[1]})
//[["bike", 60], ["motorbike", 200], ["car", 300],
//["helicopter", 400], ["airplane", 1000], ["rocket", 28800]]

Once you have the array, you could rebuild the object from the array in the order you like, thus achieving exactly what you set out to do. That would work in all the browsers I know of, but it would be dependent on an implementation quirk, and could break at any time. You should never make assumptions about the order of elements in a JavaScript object.

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4  
Can you please reformulate "you can rebuild" to "you can use array to maintain ordering of keys and pull values from object"? Not only it is non-standard, as you've yourself mentioned, this erroneous assumption is broken by more browsers than just Chrome today, so it's better not to encourage users to try it. –  Oleg V. Volkov Aug 15 '12 at 15:42
4  
Here is a more compact version of your code. Object.keys(maxSpeed).sort(function(a, b) {return -(maxSpeed[a] - maxSpeed[b])}); –  TheBrain Sep 12 '12 at 11:07
4  
@TheBrain: Just to add, keys() is only supported by IE9+ (and other modern browsers), if that is of concern. Also keys() excludes enumerable properties from the elements prototype chain (unlike for..in) - but that is usually more desirable. –  w3d Nov 28 '12 at 9:07
4  
The link has died –  Gerard Dec 19 '13 at 14:08
2  
_.pairs turns an object into [ [key1, value1], [key2, value2] ]. Then call sort on that. Then call _.object on it to turn it back. –  Funkodebat Feb 20 at 14:45

For completeness sake, this function returns sorted array of object properties:

function sortObject(obj) {
    var arr = [];
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            arr.push({
                'key': prop,
                'value': obj[prop]
            });
        }
    }
    arr.sort(function(a, b) { return a.value - b.value; });
    //arr.sort(function(a, b) { a.value.toLowerCase().localeCompare(b.value.toLowerCase()); }); //use this to sort as strings
    return arr; // returns array
}

var list = {"you": 100, "me": 75, "foo": 116, "bar": 15};
var arr = sortObject(list);
console.log(arr); // [{key:"bar", value:15}, {key:"me", value:75}, {key:"you", value:100}, {key:"foo", value:116}]

Jsfiddle with the code above is here. This solution is based on this article.

Updated fiddle for sorting strings is here. You can remove both additional .toLowerCase() conversions from it for case sensitive string comparation.

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1  
What about an array of Objects? [ {name:Will}, {name:Bill}, {name:Ben} ] –  Will Hancock Aug 16 '12 at 16:08
1  
Hi Will, you can use localeCompare function for this comparation. Added it to the answer above. –  Stano Aug 16 '12 at 16:29

JavaScript objects are unordered by definition (see the ECMAScript Language Specification, section 8.6). The language specification doesn't even guarantee that, if you iterate over the properties of an object twice in succession, they'll come out in the same order the second time.

If you need things to be ordered, use an array and the Array.prototype.sort method.

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4  
Note that's there's been quite a bit of arguing about this. Most implementations keep the list in the order in which elements were added. IIRC, Chrome doesn't. There was argument about whether Chrome should fall in line with the other implementations. My belief is that a JavaScript object is a hash and no order should be assumed. I believe Python went through the same argument and a new ordered hash-like list was recently introduced. For most browsers, you CAN do what you want by recreating your object, adding elements by sorted value. But you shouldn't. –  Nosredna Jul 1 '09 at 15:37
    
Edit. Chrome usually keeps order, but doesn't always. And here's the relevant Chromium bug: code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=883 –  Nosredna Jul 1 '09 at 15:43
6  
That bug report is unjustified, and those who relied on the undocumented behaviour are the ones with the bugs. Read ECMASCript section 8.6; it clearly states that "An Object is an unordered collection of properties". Anybody who found that it didn't seem that way in a few implementations, and then started to depend on that implementation-specific behaviour,made a big mistake, and they shouldn't be trying to shift the blame away from themselves. If I was on the Chrome team I'd mark that bug report as "Invalid, WontFix". –  NickFitz Jul 1 '09 at 15:58
6  
EcmaScript 5 actually defines the order of enumeration to be the order of insertion -- the absence of definition is considered a spec bug in ES3. It's worth noting that the EcmaScript spec defines behaviour that no one would consider sane -- for example spec behaviour is that syntax errors are in many cases thrown at runtime, incorrect use of continue, break, ++, --, const, etc according to the spec any engine that throws an exception before reaching that code is wrong –  olliej Jul 1 '09 at 21:24
3  
@olliej - I don't think this is correct. The spec says: "The mechanics and order of enumerating the properties (step 6.a in the first algorithm, step 7.a in the second) is not specified". This is on page 92 of the PDF of the final draft. –  Lee Whitney Feb 20 '12 at 17:06

We don't want to duplicate the entire data structure, or use an array where we need an associative array.

Here's another way to do the same thing as bonna:

var list = {"you": 100, "me": 75, "foo": 116, "bar": 15};
keysSorted = Object.keys(list).sort(function(a,b){return list[a]-list[b]})
alert(keysSorted);     // bar,me,you,foo
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2  
This really works (simplest). Thanks! –  Pete Alvin Jun 4 at 21:22

Your objects can have any amount of properties and you can choose to sort by whatever object property you want, number or string, if you put the objects in an array. Consider this object:

var arrayOfObjects = [   
    {
        name: 'Diana',
        born: 1373925600000, // Mon, Jul 15 2013
        num: 4,
        sex: 'male'
    },
    {

        name: 'Beyonce',
        born: 1366832953000, // Wed, Apr 24 2013
        num: 2,
        sex: 'male'
    },
    {            
        name: 'Albert',
        born: 1370288700000, // Mon, Jun 3 2013
        num: 3,
        sex: 'female'
    },    
    {
        name: 'Doris',
        born: 1354412087000, // Sat, Dec 1 2012
        num: 1,
        sex: 'male'
    }
];

sort by date born, oldest first

// use slice() to copy the array and not just make a reference
var byDate = arrayOfObjects.slice(0);
byDate.sort(function(a,b) {
    return a.born - b.born;
});
console.log('by date:');
console.log(byDate);

sort by name

var byName = arrayOfObjects.slice(0);
byName.sort(function(a,b) {
    var x = a.name.toLowerCase();
    var y = b.name.toLowerCase();
    return x < y ? -1 : x > y ? 1 : 0;
});

console.log('by name:');
console.log(byName);

http://jsfiddle.net/xsM5s/16/

share|improve this answer
    
Sort by name should not substr out the first character; else Diana and Debra have an undefined order. Also, your byDate sort actually uses num, not born. –  Lawrence Dol Mar 12 at 19:55
    
@LawrenceDol you are right on both charges, updated my answer. –  inorganik Mar 12 at 20:47
2  
thank you, inorganic, nice explanation. –  Chrysotribax Mar 25 at 17:07
    
Works like a charm! Thanks a lot!! –  Satish Kumar Dec 8 at 4:00

Underscore.js or Lodash.js for advanced array or object sorts

 var data={
        "models": {

            "LTI": [
                "TX"
            ],
            "Carado": [
                "A",
                "T",
                "A(пасс)",
                "A(груз)",
                "T(пасс)",
                "T(груз)",
                "A",
                "T"
            ],
            "SPARK": [
                "SP110C 2",
                "sp150r 18"
            ],
            "Autobianchi": [
                "A112"
            ]
        }
    };

    var arr=[],
        obj={};
    for(var i in data.models){
      arr.push([i, _.sortBy(data.models[i],function (el){return el;})]);
    }
    arr=_.sortBy(arr,function (el){
      return el[0];
    });
    _.map(arr,function (el){return obj[el[0]]=el[1];});
     console.log(obj);

demo

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I am following the solution given by slebetman (go read it for all the details), but adjusted, since your object is non-nested.

// First create the array of keys/values so that we can sort it:
var sort_array = [];
for (var key in list) {
    sort_array.push({key:key,value:list[key]});
}

// Now sort it:
sort_array.sort(function(x,y){return x.value - y.value});

// Now process that object with it:
for (var i=0;i<sort_array.length;i++) {
    var item = list[sort_array[i].key];

    // now do stuff with each item
}
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This could be a simple way to handle it as a real ordered object. Not sure how slow it is. also might be better with a while loop.

Object.sortByKeys = function(myObj){
  var keys = Object.keys(myObj)
  keys.sort()
  var sortedObject = Object()
  for(i in keys){
    key = keys[i]
    sortedObject[key]=myObj[key]
   }

  return sortedObject

}

And then I found this invert function from: http://nelsonwells.net/2011/10/swap-object-key-and-values-in-javascript/

Object.invert = function (obj) {

  var new_obj = {};

  for (var prop in obj) {
    if(obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
      new_obj[obj[prop]] = prop;
    }
  }

  return new_obj;
};

So

var list = {"you": 100, "me": 75, "foo": 116, "bar": 15};
var invertedList = Object.invert(list)
var invertedOrderedList = Object.sortByKeys(invertedList)
var orderedList = Object.invert(invertedOrderedList)
share|improve this answer

Another way to solve this:-

var res = [{"s1":5},{"s2":3},{"s3":8}].sort(function(obj1,obj2){ 
 var prop1;
 var prop2;
 for(prop in obj1) {
  prop1=prop;
 }
 for(prop in obj2) {
  prop2=prop;
 }
 //the above two for loops will iterate only once because we use it to find the key
 return obj1[prop1]-obj2[prop2];
});

//res will have the result array

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Thank you and continue answer @Nosredna

Now that we understand object need to be converted to array then sort the array. this is useful for sorting array (or converted object to array) by string:

Object {6: Object, 7: Object, 8: Object, 9: Object, 10: Object, 11: Object, 12: Object}
   6: Object
   id: "6"
   name: "PhD"
   obe_service_type_id: "2"
   __proto__: Object
   7: Object
   id: "7"
   name: "BVC (BPTC)"
   obe_service_type_id: "2"
   __proto__: Object


    //Sort options
    var sortable = [];
    for (var vehicle in options)
    sortable.push([vehicle, options[vehicle]]);
    sortable.sort(function(a, b) {
        return a[1].name < b[1].name ? -1 : 1;
    });


    //sortable => prints  
[Array[2], Array[2], Array[2], Array[2], Array[2], Array[2], Array[2]]
    0: Array[2]
    0: "11"
    1: Object
        id: "11"
        name: "AS/A2"
        obe_service_type_id: "2"
        __proto__: Object
        length: 2
        __proto__: Array[0]
    1: Array[2]
    0: "7"
    1: Object
        id: "7"
        name: "BVC (BPTC)"
        obe_service_type_id: "2"
        __proto__: Object
        length: 2
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Try this. Even your object is not having the property based on which you are trying to sort also will get handled.

Just call it by sending property with object.

var sortObjectByProperty = function(property,object){

    console.time("Sorting");
    var  sortedList      = [];
         emptyProperty   = [];
         tempObject      = [];
         nullProperty    = [];
    $.each(object,function(index,entry){
        if(entry.hasOwnProperty(property)){
            var propertyValue = entry[property];
            if(propertyValue!="" && propertyValue!=null){
              sortedList.push({key:propertyValue.toLowerCase().trim(),value:entry});  
            }else{
                emptyProperty.push(entry);
           }
        }else{
            nullProperty.push(entry);
        }
    });

      sortedList.sort(function(a,b){
           return a.key < b.key ? -1 : 1;
         //return a.key < b.key?-1:1;   // Asc 
         //return a.key < b.key?1:-1;  // Desc
      });


    $.each(sortedList,function(key,entry){
        tempObject[tempObject.length] = entry.value;
     });

    if(emptyProperty.length>0){
        tempObject.concat(emptyProperty);
    }
    if(nullProperty.length>0){
        tempObject.concat(nullProperty);
    }
    console.timeEnd("Sorting");
    return tempObject;
}
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