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I'm using the FirstChanceException event to log details about any thrown exceptions.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (sender, eventArgs) =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Inside first chance exception.");
    };

    throw new Exception("Exception thrown in main.");
}

This works as expected. But if an exception is thrown inside the event handler, a stack overflow will occur since the event will be raised recursively.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (sender, eventArgs) =>
    {
        throw new Exception("Stackoverflow");
    };

    throw new Exception("Exception thrown in main.");
}

How do I handle exceptions that occur within the event handler?

Edit:

There's a few answers suggesting that I wrap the code inside the event handler in a try/catch block, but this doesn't work since the event is raised before the exception can be handled.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (sender, eventArgs) =>
    {
        try
        {
            throw new Exception("Stackoverflow");
        }
        catch
        {
        }
    };

    throw new Exception("Exception thrown in main.");
}
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Just use a bool field to prevent recursion. –  Hans Passant May 22 '12 at 7:09
    
I dont understand why you would want this. First chance exceptions are handled. Why on earth would you throw another one? –  leppie May 22 '12 at 7:13
    
I'm not intentionally throwing another one. What happens if I'm trying to log that error and an exception is thrown while I'm trying to log that information? –  nivlam May 22 '12 at 7:14
    
@nivlam You shouldn't be logging first-chance exceptions in the first place. They're not errors if they're handled properly. –  hvd May 22 '12 at 7:16
    
This is for debugging purposes to find exceptions that are swallowed. –  nivlam May 22 '12 at 7:16
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6 Answers 6

The MSDN article you linked makes a few recommandations:

You must handle all exceptions that occur in the event handler for the FirstChanceException event. Otherwise, FirstChanceException is raised recursively. This could result in a stack overflow and termination of the application. We recommend that you implement event handlers for this event as constrained execution regions (CERs), to keep infrastructure-related exceptions such as out-of-memory or stack overflow from affecting the virtual machine while the exception notification is being processed.

So enclose your function inside a try/catch block, and call PrepareConstrainedRegion before the block to avoid OutOfMemory exceptions: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.runtime.compilerservices.runtimehelpers.prepareconstrainedregions.aspx

Edit: Well, you still have the recursion issue even with the try/catch block. So... I guess you just have to call only safe code that won't throw any exception. That event handler seems quite dangerous, I'd recommend to use it only for debugging purpose.

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I think adding another try {} catch (){} block in the exception handler would help

static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (sender, eventArgs) => 
    { 
        try {
            throw new Exception("Stackoverflow"); 
        } catch (Exception e)
        {
           // Do something very simple not throwing an exception...
        }
    }; 

    throw new Exception("Exception thrown in main."); 
} 
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This doesn't work. The FirstChanceException event is raised before the exception can be handled in the catch block. –  nivlam May 22 '12 at 6:56
    
Didn't know, thx for letting me know! –  MichelZ May 22 '12 at 7:29
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Handle inside exceptions manually e.g.

static void Main(string[] args) {
     AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += (sender, eventArgs) =>
     {
         try{
         throw new Exception("Stackoverflow");} catch (Exception ex){/*manual handle*/}
     };
      throw new Exception("Exception thrown in main.");
 } 
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First use a method instead of a delegate, so the method name will be defined

Then use Environment.StackTrace to check if the method is already in the stacktrace

Here is a piece of code untested:

static void Main(string[] args) 
{ 
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException += handleFirstChanceException;
} 

private void handleFirstChanceException(object sender, EventArgs eventArgs)
{
    if (Environment.StackTrace.Contains("handleFirstChanceException"))
        return;

    // handle
}

I think the above will not work because it'll always contains the method name, but you can count if it appear more than 1 time. Also, check that it's not inlined when you compile in Release mode, in this case you're in trouble

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What happens when the Environment.StackTrace property getter throws an exception? –  hvd May 22 '12 at 14:13
    
Why should it throw ? Doc (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) say it can only throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeException but I couldn't in which case –  Fabske May 22 '12 at 17:04
    
Anything can always throw an OutOfMemoryException. Which will trigger a first-chance exception, and attempt to get another stack trace, which will also fail, since you're out of memory. –  hvd May 22 '12 at 17:43
    
Indeed, but if your application throw an OutOfMemoryException, it's already ready to crash ... so instead of crashing with OutOfMemory, it'll crash with StackOverflow –  Fabske May 23 '12 at 6:52
    
I'm not a fan of "it's already going wrong, so there's no problem making it worse" arguments, but there are other exceptions Exception.StackTrace might give too. Like you, I have no idea when ArgumentOutOfRangeException might be thrown, but the list in the documentation is not an exhaustive list. It doesn't list the potential SecurityException either, for example. In addition, I see no reason for assuming Environment.StackTrace doesn't sometimes internally throw and catch exceptions, which would again trigger the FirstChanceException event. –  hvd May 23 '12 at 7:50
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Eventhough it is not a good way, in VB .NET you can prevent exception firing inside FirstChanceException event handler using "On Error Resume Next" statement, coming from VB 6. (I am not sure if C# has something similar) Additionally, you should prevent recursion on the event handler as mentioned here. Following is the sample code, seems to work as expected.

Sub Main(args As String())
    AddHandler AppDomain.CurrentDomain.FirstChanceException, AddressOf FirstChanceExceptionEventHandler
    Throw New Exception("Exception thrown in main.")
End Sub

Private Sub FirstChanceExceptionEventHandler(ByVal source As Object, ByVal e As FirstChanceExceptionEventArgs)
    On Error Resume Next

    Dim frames As StackFrame() = New StackTrace(1).GetFrames()
    Dim currentMethod As MethodBase = MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod()
    If frames IsNot Nothing AndAlso frames.Any(Function(x) x.GetMethod() = currentMethod) Then
        Return
    Else
        Throw New Exception("Stackoverflow")
    End If
End Sub
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In general exception you can handle like all others, but what about in particular StackOverflow and OutOfMemory exception, they can not be handled in .NET Framework.

Look here: How do I prevent and/or handle a StackOverflowException? (C#)

Starting with the .NET Framework version 2.0, a StackOverflowException object cannot be caught by a try-catch block and the corresponding process is terminated by default. Consequently, users are advised to write their code to detect and prevent a stack overflow. For example, if your application depends on recursion, use a counter or a state condition to terminate the recursive loop.

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I'm not looking to catch a stackoverflow exception. I'm looking for a way to prevent it from happening. –  nivlam May 22 '12 at 6:54
    
@nivlam: to prevent it happening just do not call the function that creates stack overflow in a way you call it. What solution are you searching for, so?? –  Tigran May 22 '12 at 6:55
    
Your post says: "How do I handle exceptions that occur within the event handler?" , so what this really stands for? –  Tigran May 22 '12 at 6:56
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