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Please check the following section of code (Simplified version)

my concern is in the ReadPath class where I need to call the GetPath() of the type i am using. How can I achieve this?

public interface IPath
{
    string GetPath();
}

public class classA: IPath
{
    string GetPath()
    {
        return "C:\";
    }
}
public class classB: IPath
{
    string GetPath()
    {
        return "D:\";
    }
}
public class ReadPath<T> where T : IPath
{        
    public List<T> ReadType()
    {
        // How to call GetPath() associated with the context type.
    }        
}
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It is unclear what you are trying to achieve. How do want to call the GetPath() instance method? There is no IPath instance, so you will have to pass it in, or create it. –  Steven May 22 '12 at 7:19
1  
Your subject mentions static, yet, no other mention. This is confusing. –  leppie May 22 '12 at 7:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Interfaces are instance based. So if you want to do that, pass in an instance and work with that.

However, there is a concept that is type-based: attributes:

[TypePath(@"C:\")]
public class classA
{
}
[TypePath(@"D:\")]
public class classB
{
}
public class ReadPath<T>
{        
    public static List<T> ReadType()
    {
        var attrib = (TypePathAttribute)Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(
              typeof(T), typeof(TypePathAttribute));
        var path = attrib.Path;
        ...
    }        
}

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Class | AttributeTargets.Struct
    | AttributeTargets.Interface | AttributeTargets.Enum,
    AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = false)]
public class TypePathAttribute : Attribute
{
    public string Path { get; private set; }
    public TypePathAttribute(string path) { Path = path; }
}
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public interface IPath
{
    string GetPath();
}

public class classA : IPath
{
    public string GetPath()
    {
        return @"C:\";
    }
}
public class classB : IPath
{
    public string GetPath()
    {
        return @"D:\";
    }
}
public class ReadPath<T> where T : IPath, new()
{
    private IPath iPath;
    public List<T> ReadType()
    {
        iPath = new T();
        iPath.GetPath();
        //return some list of type T

    }
}
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Thanks man. that new () is new to me :) –  Boomer May 22 '12 at 7:21
    
The better way to use delegate to create an instance of T class. For example, to pass it to ReadType. if you plan to call ReadType very often new() is cost operation. –  Eugene Petrov May 22 '12 at 7:27
    
Creating an object out of the ether just to use an interface smacks of object abuse. By definition, it must be using predictable values (it is new(), not a caller-configured object). I honestly believe this is a bad solution, that wrongly gives the impression of correctly using the interface. Passing in a configured object would be reasonable, but otherwise: I would strongly suggest something like attributes instead. Also, the T here is a leaf/row-level object, not a configuration object... /cc @Boomer –  Marc Gravell May 22 '12 at 7:27

Another solution is instance member, but you should change a declaration of generic a little bit:

public class ReadPath<T> where T : IPath, new() //default ctor presence
{       
    T mem = new T();
    public string  ReadType()
    {
        return mem.GetPath();
    }        
}

Not that I changed returned type as it's not clear how you gonna fit return type string with List<T>

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You are confusing between few different aspects of .net/c# programing.
Static methods (which you dont even have here) cannot be defined via interfaces, so if you're interested in using static methods, the interface wotn help you, and you could execute such method in a generic way only by means of reflection.

Your code is abit not clear, hard to understand why your readtype method returns a list, and how are you supposed to fill up this list.

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