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There are a few questions on this subject, but most skirt around this issue because it's not the intent of the question.

If I have a static volatile in my class:

private static volatile MyObj obj = null;

and in a method below I do:

public MyObj getMyObj() {
    if (obj == null) {
        obj = new MyObj();// costly initialisation
    }
    return obj;
}

will I need to synchronize to ensure only one thread writes to the field, or will any writes be immediately visible to other threads evaluating the obj == null conditional?

To put it another way: does volatile get you around having to synchronize access to writes on a static variable?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You'd definitely need some sort of locking to ensure that only one thread writes to the field. Regardless of the volatility, two threads can both "see" that obj is null, and then both start initializing with your current code.

Personally I'd take one of three options:

  • Initialize on class load (knowing that that will be lazy, but not as lazy as waiting until getMyObj is first called):

    private static final MyObj obj = new MyObj();
    
  • Use unconditional locking:

    private static MyObj obj;
    private static final Object objLock = new Object();
    
    public static MyObj getMyObj() {
        synchronized(objLock) {
            if (obj == null) {
                obj = new MyObj();
            }
            return obj;
        }
    }
    
  • Use a nested class for laziness that way:

    public static MyObj getMyObj() {
        return MyObjHolder.obj;
    }
    
    private static class MyObjHolder {
        static final MyObj obj = new MyObj();
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
I can't go the holder route: it forces singleton on my outer class which requires far more thinking and changes to the overall framework I'm developing. The problem I needed to solve was the atomic creation of the static instance. I used a static method and declared it (obj) static final to allow for atomic assignment and concurrent safety. – atc May 22 '12 at 8:52
    
@atc: No, the holder route doesn't force the outer class to be a singleton. It's not really clear what you mean here... – Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 10:03
    
For clarity: this static volatile variable was originally in an Object Factory that injected it at runtime to instances it was responsible for creating. This is due to the implementation detail of said staic var (MyObj above). The use of the private constructor to satisfy the holder idiom meant I couldn't keep the advantages of inheritence for the Object Factory. Instead of bastardizing the holder idiom here, I thought I'd go the double-check-synchronize route as that had least friction with the codebase and was proven to work. – atc May 22 '12 at 13:22
    
@atc: Why couldn't you keep the advantages of inheritance? Sorry, it's really not clear what's going on - particularly as you seem to be having some instance-specific ideas, and some static (global) context... – Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 14:34
    
The impression I got from the holder idiom was that the constructor needed to be private. I didn't want that: my object factory could be extended in the future and it's valid for a "client" of it to create new instances. The global state you're referring to is just injection of the static class to ensure reuse because of costly initialisation. – atc May 23 '12 at 7:23

Yes, you should absolutely synchronize (or use a better idiom like the Singleton Holder idiom). Otherwise you run the risk of multiple threads initializing your object multiple times (and then subsequently using different instances).

Consider a sequence of events like this:

  1. Thread A enters getMyObj() and sees that obj == null
  2. Thread B enters getMyObj() and sees that obj == null
  3. Thread A constructs a new MyObj() - let's call it objA
  4. Thread B constructs a new MyObj() - let's call it objB
  5. Thread A assigns objA to obj
  6. Thread B assigns objB to obj (which is not null anymore at this point, so the reference to objA, assigned by Thread A, is overwritten)
  7. Thread A exits getMyObj() and starts to use objA
  8. Thread B exits getMyObj() and starts to use objB

This scenario can happen with any number of threads. Note that although here, for the sake of simplicity, I assumed a strict ordering of events, in a real multithreaded environment events 1-2, 3-4 and/or 7-8 can partly or fully overlap in time, without changing the end result.

An example to the holder idiom:

public class Something {
    private Something() {
    }

    private static class LazyHolder {
        public static final Something INSTANCE = new Something();
    }

    public static Something getInstance() {
        return LazyHolder.INSTANCE;
    }
}

This is guaranteed to be safe, as INSTANCE is final. The Java memory model guarantees that final fields are initialized and made visible correctly to any number of threads, upon loading the containing class. Since LazyHolder is private and is referenced only by getInstance(), it will only get loaded when getInstance() is first called. And at that point, INSTANCE is initialized in the background and published safely by the JVM.

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I could just have the field static and use a static initializer or static method to do the creation, allowing for synchronized and try/catch logic. This way it'll be more readable + I won't have to have a lock on the getMyObj() call because the static initializer will be done before the class is made available. – atc May 22 '12 at 7:43
    
@atc, your description is ambiguous, so I can't assess its thread safety and viability without a code sample. Note that the holder idiom uses no locks either (the JVM will have a lock around the construction of LazyHolder, once, but getInstance() itself is not synchronized). – Péter Török May 22 '12 at 7:58

No, you will still need to synchronize the access. volatile allows changes made to a variable by one thread to be seen by other threads.

Imagine the following flow of execution (assuming two threads T1 & T2):

  1. obj is null initally.
  2. T1: if (obj == null): YES
  3. T2: if (obj == null): YES
  4. T1: creates a new instance of MyObj and assign it to obj
  5. T2: also creates a new instance of MyObj and assign it to obj

You create twice an object you expected to be created only once. And this is not the worse scenario. You could end up returning an object that is no longer assigned to your variable too.

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That code is not thread safe. If multiple threads execute the function then multiple instances of MyObj could be created. You need some form of synchronization here.

The fundamental issue is that this block code:

if (obj == null) {
     obj = new MyObj();// costly initialisation
}

is not atomic. In fact it's a very long way from being atomic.

share|improve this answer

Yet another way to handle this is double-checking (NOTE: works only with Java 5 or newer, see here for details):

public class DoubleCheckingSingletonExample
{
    private static final Object lockObj = new Object();

    private static volatile DoubleCheckingSingletonExample instance;

    private DoubleCheckingSingletonExample()
    {
        //Initialization
    }

    public static DoubleCheckingSingletonExample getInstance()
    {
        if(instance == null)
        {
            synchronized(lockObj)
            {
                if(instance == null)
                {
                    instance = new DoubleCheckingSingletonExample();
                }
            }
        }

        return instance;
    }
}

When getInstance is called from two threads simultaneously, both will first see the instance as null, another one enters the synchronized-block, and instantiates the object. The other will see instance is no longer null, and won't try to instantiate it. Further calls to getInstance will see that the instance is not null, and won't try to lock at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Double checked locking like this needs JDK5 in order to work correctly: cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html – David Heffernan May 22 '12 at 7:37
2  
Sorry, correct link is here: cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html – David Heffernan May 22 '12 at 10:07
    
@DavidHeffernan: thanks for the link, didn't know about the "JDK5 or newer"-requirement. I'll edit the answer to include this information. – esaj May 22 '12 at 10:14

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