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A common scenario in my code is that I got a functor that is used by many classes in a hierachy.

To make it accessible by all classes and stay DRY, I usually define it as a protected inner struct of my base class like that:

class Base
{
protected:
    struct CommonFunctor
    {
        bool operator()()
        {
            return true;
        }
    };
};

class DerivedA : public Base
{
    void FooA()
    {
        bool test = CommonFunctor()();
    }
};

class DerivedB : public Base
{
    void FooB()
    {
        bool test = CommonFunctor()();
    }
};

I don't like that solution because it clutters my base class with many small functors, that are internal only and even if they are not accessible to the public, they decrease readability of my base class.

Do you know any other solutions for this scenario?

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1  
What's the problem with them being defined in the same namespace as the classes they work with? –  Gene Bushuyev May 22 '12 at 7:56
    
Why not just declare the functor operator()() in the class definition and define the functor elsewhere? –  hmjd May 22 '12 at 8:05
    
@hmjd: That's what I did. I only merged definition and declaration for my code example. Still a lot of clutter in my base class header file... –  nabulke May 22 '12 at 8:11
    
@GeneBushuyev: You are right: I could just declare all those functors inside my namespace in a separate header file like CommonFunctors.h and include it in all my derived classes. Is this what you meant? –  nabulke May 22 '12 at 8:13
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just implement your functors in new files (BaseClassFunctors.cpp + BaseClassFunctors.h). Put them inside your namespace with an optional subnamespaces (e.g. namespace main.internal).

Now you include the header file in any derived classes you want, without cluttering the base class header.

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As much as I (and, apparently, everyone else) hate multiple inheritance, it would come in handy here.

Just create a second class that contains all your functors and in your child classes derived from Base, inherit both Base and this new class.

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I never thought to use multiple inheritance for that. Thanks for a new insight. –  nabulke May 22 '12 at 7:51
    
I hope it answers your question. Another solution would be to make your functor class derive from Base, then derive DerivedA and DerivedB from the functor class alone. Less clean, more hacky. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 22 '12 at 7:52
    
This is certainly one answer to my question. I wonder if there are any other solutions out there.... –  nabulke May 22 '12 at 7:54
    
Derivation means is-a relationship, nothing to do with functors. –  Gene Bushuyev May 22 '12 at 7:57
    
@Gene doesn't matter what derivation means so much as how it works and what it lets you do. If it makes you feel better, call the class ConsumerOfManyFunctors and then DerivedA and DerivedB and can derive from it, if that makes you feel better knowing you can say DerivedA is-a ConsumerOfManyFunctors. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 22 '12 at 8:00
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You can just implement the functor elsewhere and still keep it as a member of the Base:

class Base
{
protected:
    struct CommonFunctor;
};   

struct Base::CommonFunctor
{
    bool operator()()
    {
        return true;
    }
};
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