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I have 6 arrays, each has 8 elements. I'd like to write a method that reveals ALL the possible combinations of ALL the elements of ALL arrays like:

firstArray firstElement, secondArray firstElement,.... sixthArray firstElement

firstArray SECONDElement, secondArray firstElement,.... sixthArray firstElement

.... etc...

firstArray lastElement, secondArray lastElement,.... sixthArray lastElement

how can I do this in the most efficent way? (the most performance-friendly- way?)

for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) { 
  for (int j = 0; j < B.length; j++) { 
    for (int h = 0; h < C.length; h++) { 
      for (int k = 0; k < D.length; k++) { 
        for (int l = 0; l < E.length; l++) { 
          for (int n = 0; n < F.length; n++) { 
            System.out.println(A[i] + " " 
                             + B[j] + " " 
                             + C[h] + " " 
                             + D[k] + " " 
                             + E[l] + " " 
                             + F[n]); 
          } 
        }  
      } 
    }  
  }  
}
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Look at enumerating the possible combinations, and using the indeces to look up the elements in the array –  maress May 22 '12 at 8:30
    
can you pls elaborate more... with examples –  Imposter May 22 '12 at 8:41
    
I cannot format the example so sorry for the ugly formatting below: Instead of that I wanted something more efficient –  Regenbogenfisch May 23 '12 at 8:30
    
for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) { for (int j = 0; j < B.length; j++) { for (int h = 0; h < C.length; h++) { for (int k = 0; k < D.length; k++) { for (int l = 0; l < E.length; l++) { for (int n = 0; n < F.length; n++) { System.out.println(A[i] + " " + B[j] + " " + C[h] + " " + D[k] + " " + E[l] + " " + F[n]); } } } } } } –  Regenbogenfisch May 23 '12 at 8:33
    
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Simplest Code would be -

for(first array a){
   for(second array b){
      for(third array c){
         for(fourth array d){
             for(fifth array e){
                 for(sixth array f){
                     System.out.println(a[], b[], c[], d[], e[], f[]);
                 }
             }
          }
       }
     }
  }

This is not good performance wise as it will take - no. of arrays * element per array * element per array time.

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yes, those six for loops look wicked, when it comes to performance. thanks anyway –  Regenbogenfisch May 22 '12 at 8:37
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This is fast becoming an SO FAQ, but for the life of me I can't find the right question that this is a duplicate of, so here's the FPA (frequently provided answer).

Generate all the 6-digit base-8 numbers from 000000 to 777777 in turn. Each number specifies one of the sets you are looking for: the first digit identifies the element of the first array, the second digit the element of the second array, etc.

That should be enough to get you started, any 'help' I provided in Java would be laughed at. Whether this is better than the answer you already have (or indeed, materially different from it), I leave you and others to judge.

For your future reference you are trying to compute the cartesian product of your 6 arrays. As to the efficiency of these approaches, well computing the cartesian product of 2 sets each of n elements is O(n^2) and there is no getting around that by clever programming. So for 6 sets, each of n elements, the computational complexity is going to be O(n^6).

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Thanks, I had this solution but I was looking for a shotcut, to somehow "speed" up the process by clever programming since that might (and probably will) run for ages, becaouse I have to call this method frequently –  Regenbogenfisch May 22 '12 at 8:53
    
Probably it was my mistake I put the word of "brute force" as tag, it was probably misleading. –  Regenbogenfisch May 22 '12 at 9:04
    
The fast way to compute something with complexity O(n^6) is to not compute it, but to store the results the first time you compute it. Whether, and how, this works for your situation, is for you. –  High Performance Mark May 22 '12 at 9:05
    
Probably it was my mistake I put the word of "brute force" as tag, it was misleading. I had the solution with for loops, but it is not really acceptable as the whole program might run for an hour with this with this relatively little task. So if there is not a clever way then I have to ditch this method altogether, and redesign the whole application –  Regenbogenfisch May 22 '12 at 9:10
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