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I am trying to create an object. But I dont understand why my property getters setters cannot simply call this.bar. As such my foo object seems to end up with two properties.

Is this correct or am I:

  1. using defineProperties wrong
  2. missing the point

creating foo with a bar property

var foo = function ()
{   
    Object.defineProperties(this, {
        bar : {
            get : function () {return this.barVal},
            set : function(value) { this.barVal = value},
            enumerable: true,
            configurable: true
        }
    })
};

var o = new foo();
o.bar = "Hello";
console.log(JSON.stringify(o));

//output {"bar":"Hello","barVal":"Hello"} 
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

JSON.stringify activates the getter to resolve the property. Your setter sets a second property, so you end up seeing both. What you need is a way to store the "internal" value for foo.bar that isn't ON foo itself.

function Foo(){
  var secret = {};
  Object.defineProperties(this, {
    bar: {
      get: function( ){ return secret.bar },
      set: function(v){ secret.bar = v },
      enumerable: true,
      configurable: true
    }
  });
}


var foo = new Foo;
foo.bar = 'Hello';
console.log(JSON.stringify(foo));
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How interesting. So defineProperties is really only for very complex objects? otherwise it strikes me as overkill. I just wanted to pre-define properties (I'm used to c# so this is a bit of a learning curve) –  CrimsonChin May 22 '12 at 10:10
    
If you just want to set a value then you can simply do this.bar = value. Object.defineProperty is for either accessors (set/get) or data (value) when you want enumerable/configurable/writable to be false. –  benvie May 22 '12 at 10:18
    
Also Object.defineProperty can be used to just UPDATE an existing property. Like say you wanted to make a property non-enumerable: this.bar = 'Hello'; Object.defineProperty(this, 'bar', { enumerable: false }); would work as desired, maintaining the existing value but modifying enumerability. –  benvie May 22 '12 at 10:21

You are creating two properties, one named "bar" and the other named "barVal". "bar" is created by the defineProperties call and "barVal" is created by the this.barVal assignment in the set function. They both have a true value for their enumerable attribute (you explicitly set it for varVal, the assignment implicitly set it for barVal) so they are both listed by JSON.stringify.

If you intent is for barVal to be treated as a private value that does not show up in a JSON or for-in enumeration you can explicitly set its enumerable attribute to false:

var foo = function ()
{   
    Object.defineProperties(this, {
        bar : {
            get : function () {return this.barVal},
            set : function(value) { this.barVal = value},
            enumerable: true,
            configurable: true
        },
        barVal : {
            value: undefined,
            enumerable: false, writable: true, configurable: true
        }
    })
};
share|improve this answer
    
Or simply declare barVal as a local variable of function foo –  HBP May 23 '12 at 5:53

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