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I have a map namely valueMap

typedef std::map<std::string, std::string>MAP;
MAP valueMap;
...
//Entering data

Then I am passing this map to a function by reference

void function(const MAP &map)
{
  std::string value = map["string"];
  // by doing so i am getting error.
}

How can I get the value from the map, which is passed as a reference to a function?

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5  
When posting about an error you get, you should always include the actual error in the question. –  Joachim Pileborg May 22 '12 at 9:59
    
ok. I will take care of this. Thanks –  Aneesh Narayanan May 22 '12 at 10:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Unfortunately std::map::operator[] is a non-const member function, and you have a const reference.

You either need to change the signature of function or do:

MAP::const_iterator pos = map.find("string");
if (pos == map.end()) {
    //handle the error
} else {
    std::string value = pos->second;
    ...
}

operator[] handles the error by adding a default-constructed value to the map and returning a reference to it. This is no use when all you have is a const reference, so you will need to do something different.

You could ignore the possibility and write string value = map.find("string")->second;, if your program logic somehow guarantees that "string" is already a key. The obvious problem is that if you're wrong then you get undefined behavior.

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1  
use MAP::const_iterator intead of auto if your compiler does not support auto yet. –  smerlin May 22 '12 at 10:06
    
shouldnt it be std::string value = pos->second; or const std::string& value = pos->second;? –  smerlin May 22 '12 at 10:09
    
@smerlin: good point, fixed. Whether the questioner actually needs a copy of the value, or could use a const reference, depends on code not shown. So I decided not to bother with it :-) –  Steve Jessop May 22 '12 at 10:09

map.at("key") throws exception if missing key

If k does not match the key of any element in the container, the function throws an out_of_range exception.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/map/map/at/

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