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I've been doing some tutorials, and a lot of reading on Windows Workflow recently, and was just wondering if it would be practical to use it in an eCommerce website - at the check out for example...?

Customer Checks basket customer enters delivery information customer checks order customer pays done

or am i barking up the wrong tree?

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rob Conery did something similar in one of his ASP.NET MVC Storefront tutorials.

Is it possible, absolutely.

Would you actually want to use WF to do this sort of thing. I wouldn't advise any of my clients to do this for two reasons:

  1. In most cases the cost of instantiating and loading WF is overkill for the task being accomplished. A simple state machine implementation will suffice in most cases.
  2. The current version of WF is end-of-lifetime. Microsoft has already announced that there will be significant breaking changes in the next release of WF. I feel like WF is at the wrong end of the $$$ versus value added equation at this point.
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Yes, that would be a practical use.

However, Microsofts Commerce Server uses a pipeline technology.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd451186.aspx

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