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>>> odd,even=[ ],[ ]
>>> [even.append(x) if x%2==0 else odd.append(x) for x in range(51)]
[None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None, None]
>>> odd
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49]

my question: is it possible to separate the odd and even numbers in the list comprehension statement even without declaring the odd, even = [], [] at the beginning?

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12  
Using a list comprehension for sideeffects is unpythonic – John La Rooy May 22 '12 at 10:42
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try this version: for me elegnat,compact and fine to understand

even,odd = [],[]
for x in range(51): x%2 and even.append(x) or odd.append(x)
share|improve this answer
    
thats pretty nice solution. when i ask question I always get more than I could even thought. – sunny1304 May 22 '12 at 11:20
    
if you like my solution, pleas upvote! :) – DonCallisto May 22 '12 at 11:21
4  
This is short, but readable should always be preferred over short. – Gareth Latty May 22 '12 at 11:28
    
@Lattyware is just a matter of habits. Since I always write them down in this way, for me this is readable and compact but i got your point and is a valid notice – DonCallisto May 22 '12 at 11:32
4  
I don't like this use of and/or when you can do this and it is even shorter: for x in range(51): (odd if x%2 else even).append(x) – jamylak May 22 '12 at 11:35

Best to just loop once. It's 6 lines, but they are fast lines

odd, even=[ ], [ ]
for x in range(51):
    if x%2:
        odd.append(x)
    else:
        even.append(x)
share|improve this answer
even,odd = [],[]
for x in range(51): 
    (odd if x%2 else even).append(x)
share|improve this answer

Consider this

evens = [i for i in xrange(1,1000) if i % 2]
odds = [i for i in xrange(1,1000) if i % 2 != 0]
share|improve this answer
    
thanks,but i want to know if it is possible to combine them in 1 statement – sunny1304 May 22 '12 at 10:45
    
Look bellow that is one statement. – Jakob Bowyer May 22 '12 at 10:45
>>> even, odd = [[x for x in range(51) if x%2 == 0], [x for x in range(51) if x%2 == 1]]
>>> even
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50]
>>> odd
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49]

I wouldn't recommend this method, but here's a way you could do it with "only one loop" I guess:

>>> even, odd = zip(*[(x, x + 1) for x in range(0, 51, 2)])
>>> even
(0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50)
>>> odd
(1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51)
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2  
Yours is nice but sometimes spreading things out is nice too – Jakob Bowyer May 22 '12 at 10:45

I like to draw attention to itertools and in particular, the itertools recipes in the Python help. Here we can use the partition function (backported to Python 2.7)

from itertools import tee, ifilter, ifilterfalse

def partition(pred, iterable):
    'Use a predicate to partition entries into false entries and true entries'
    # partition(is_odd, range(10)) --> 0 2 4 6 8   and  1 3 5 7 9
    t1, t2 = tee(iterable)
    return ifilterfalse(pred, t1), ifilter(pred, t2)

def is_odd(n):
    return bool(n%2)

evens, odds = partition(is_odd, range(51))

print list(evens)
print list(odds)

In fact, the example in the docstring explains exactly this case use. It returns iterators and hence the need for using list when printing.

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If this is a simplified problem using numbers for convenience, then my answer isn't relevant, but the simplest way to do what you have requested is really:

>>> odd, even = range(1, 51, 2), range(0, 51, 2)

Which gives you:

>>> list(odd)
[1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35, 37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49]
>>> list(even)
[0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 34, 36, 38, 40, 42, 44, 46, 48, 50]
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my intention was to learn more about list comprehension statement,but urs one is a nice solution. – sunny1304 May 22 '12 at 11:54

Tackling the generic problem:

Given a predicate function predicate returning either True or False when given an object, separate a list into two sublists according to the predicate while preserving the order

Then we may use a the fact that the sorted funciton is stable, so if we sort with predicate as key, the list is effectively split in two at an unknown point while preserving order within each part, with values for which predicate is False to the left and values for which it is True to the right.

Now we can use itertools.groupby with the same key to split at this unknown point.

from itertools import groupby

predicate = lambda x: x % 2 == 0

def group_by_predicate(L, pred):
    return [list(i) for k, i in groupby(sorted(L, key=pred), key=pred)]

odd, even = group_by_predicate(range(51), predicate)

This will work even if the values for which predicate is True are not evenly spaced... say for instance if predicate is True for prime numbers.

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