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  • I have 2 exactly same machines(COM1 - COM2) and both are single-core.
  • Both machines have couchdb and tomcat running
  • My application queries the database via rest requests, and i am implemented a threadpool of 10 to fasten the process. Each thread has its own database instance.

  • When I set my application to use the local database with threadpool (war file is in COM1, database is in COM1), 30 queries take 431.83 miliseconds. Same config without threadpool it takes 823.83 miliseconds.
  • However when I set it to use the remote database with threadpool, (war is in COM1, database is in COM2), 30 queries take 276.52 miliseconds. Same config without threadpool it takes 960.00 miliseconds.

My questions are:

  1. Why I am getting spead increase in single core when I use thread pool?
  2. Why remote database configuration is faster than local one?

Thanks

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1 Answer 1

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Why I am getting spead increase in single core when I use thread pool?

Threads aren't always doing stuff on CPU. Some will be reading data from disk, network, memory etc., and other threads can use the CPU in the mean time. If you have a espresso maker AND a milk steamer, letting two people work on producing cappuccino will be faster than having one guy working at it.

Why remote database configuration is faster than local one?

If your query is CPU intensive, it is conceivable that having two CPUs at hand gains enough performance that your loss in network latency is compensated. I.e. if your espresso making takes enough time, then it makes sense to use the espresso maker in the next floor even if you have to climb the stairs. Note that doing that if you only have one guy makes no sense. That's why you get 960ms instead of 823ms for that setup (i.e. useless stair climbing).

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