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I have a property in a class:

public int this[int index]
        {
            get { return _desk[index]; }
            set { _desk[index] = value; }
        }

But I cant use this class in Linq. How to make it ?

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1  
Please give an example of what you're trying to do. Your question is unclear. –  Greg B May 22 '12 at 12:00
    
How do you want to use it? What do you mean with "I can't use this"? If the indexer is the only way to access your data then you may consider to implement IEnumerable<int> –  Adriano Repetti May 22 '12 at 12:00
2  
What do you mean "I can't use this class"? We can see neither a class nor how you are trying to use it. –  Jon May 22 '12 at 12:00
1  
How is anyone supposed to understand this question ? –  Alex May 22 '12 at 12:10
    
var position = new Position(); var count = position.Count() –  alerya May 22 '12 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

An indexer doesn't automatically give you enumeration. In order to be able to call LINQ methods, you need to implement IEnumerable<int> on your class.

I'm assuming your _desk object is a simple array - if I'm wrong here and _desk is something other class that has an indexer, you may need to make that class implement IEnumerable<int> too.

You'd then need to do something like this:

public class Position : IEnumerable<int>
{
    private int[] _desk;

    public int this[int index]
    {
        get { return _desk[index]; }
        set { _desk[index] = value; }
    }

    /* the rest of your class */

    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return ((IEnumerable<int>)_desk).GetEnumerator();
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _desk.GetEnumerator();
    }
}

I've no idea if the implementations of GetEnumerator() are best practice when wrapping an array, but they should work.

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If your class doesn't implement IEnumerable<T> but has an indexer and a Count property, you can create an IEnumerable of indexes using the Enumerable.Range Method, and project each index to the collection item using the Enumerable.Select Extension Method:

var query = Enumerable.Range(0, obj.Count)
                      .Select(index => obj[index])
                      ...
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3  
+1, this is a viable alternative to implementing IEnumerable<..> (especially if the class isn't under your control), I don't understand the downvote. –  Rawling May 22 '12 at 12:22
1  
+1 Very nice solution! I guess people always need "ready to use" code even when you need a glass ball to guess their intent... –  Adriano Repetti May 22 '12 at 12:31

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