Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering if you can access the result-document during processing.

The reason I ask is that I am transforming an input document and would like to insert elements depending on some conditions but this would have to occur when I have traversed the tree and I am nearly at end of creating it.

The transformed xml looks something similar to this:

<xform>
    <xforms>
        <model>
            <instance>
                <data />
                <data />
            </instance>
        </model>
        <bind />
        <bind />
        <bind />
    </xforms>
</xform>

I intend, during transformation (before the above xml is serialized), to access the <instance> tag and insert additional <data> elements.

Note The input document is different from the above xml - the above xml is what the transformation should produce.

Similarly, I would want to access the <xform> element and insert additional <bind> nodes.

So the final document would look like this (assuming I added 2 data nodes and 2 bind nodes):

<xform>
    <xforms>
        <model>
            <instance>
                <data />
                <data />
                <data>new data node</data>
                <data>second new data node</data>
            </instance>
        </model>
        <bind />
        <bind />
        <bind />
        <bind>new bind node</bind>
        <bind>second new bind node</bind>
    </xforms>
</xform>

Any help is appreciated.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, you can't access a result-document, you can however create temporary trees in variables and then process them again, if needed with templates with a different mode. So instead of e.g.

<xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:result-document href="example.xml">
<xform>
 <xforms>
  <model>
   <instance>
    <data>
    </data>
   </instance>
  </model>
  <bind />
  <bind />
  <bind />
 </xforms>
</xform>
  </xsl:result-document>
</xsl:template>

you would create the first result in a variable and then process it further as in e.g.

<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="temp1">
<xform>
 <xforms>
  <model>
   <instance>
    <data>
    </data>
   </instance>
  </model>
  <bind />
  <bind />
  <bind />
 </xforms>
</xform>
</xsl:variable>
  <xsl:result-document href="example.xml">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="$temp1/*"/>
  </xsl:result-document>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="instance">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
    <data>...</data>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

That sample does not use modes but I often use them with variables and different processing steps to cleanly seperate the templates for each step from other steps.

share|improve this answer
    
the xml I pasted above is not an input doc, it is what the transformation is meant to produce. –  user626607 May 22 '12 at 12:56
    
Thanks Martin, your answer actually led me to the correct solution. I have decided to hold the first processed nodes in a variable which I pass to later templates for manipulation. I will accept this answer. –  user626607 May 23 '12 at 10:28

Yes, the way to do this is with multi-pass processing:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*" mode="#default pass2">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*" mode="#current"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:variable name="vPass1">
    <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </xsl:variable>

  <xsl:apply-templates select="$vPass1/node()" mode="pass2"/>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="instance" mode="pass2">
  <instance>
    <xsl:apply-templates mode="pass2"/>
    <data>2</data>
    <data>3</data>
  </instance>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="model" mode="pass2">
  <model>
   <xsl:apply-templates mode="pass2"/>
   <bind>1</bind>
   <bind>2</bind>
   <bind>3</bind>
  </model>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<xform>
    <xforms>
        <model>
            <instance>
                <data>
                </data>
            </instance>
        </model>
        <bind />
        <bind />
        <bind />
    </xforms>
</xform>

it transforms it to itself using the identity rule and the result of this first pass is captured in the variable $vPass1. Then the second pass processes the current results in $vPass1 and adds two new data children under the instance element and three bind children under the model element -- so the final result is:

<xform>
   <xforms>
      <model>
         <instance>
            <data/>
            <data>2</data>
            <data>3</data>
         </instance>
         <bind>1</bind>
         <bind>2</bind>
         <bind>3</bind>
      </model>
      <bind/>
      <bind/>
      <bind/>
   </xforms>
</xform>
share|improve this answer
    
I see that the additional <bind> are added in the <model> element, I would want them to be added next to the other <bind> elements, so in your example, I would have 6 new <bind> elements. Also, the xml I gave above is what is being output - it is not the input doc - which I think you made an assumption with when you suggested this answer - no? –  user626607 May 22 '12 at 12:54
    
@Kata: No, I am processing something to produce that XML document -- and this "something" happens to be the same document (I dont have your original source XML document neither do I have your transformation) the output is the result of the identity transformation in the first pass. As for your wishes for different additions -- this all you can do yourself. I have just showed you how to process a document in two passes and add to the result of the first pass whatever nodes you want to at whatever places you want to. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 22 '12 at 12:59
    
You are right, I will work with this and let you know how it goes. Thank you so much - I appreciate the help. –  user626607 May 22 '12 at 13:02
    
@Kata: I am glad that my answer is useful to you. Could you, please accept this answer? –  Dimitre Novatchev May 22 '12 at 13:05
    
I meant that you are right in that you showed me how to use a multi-pass processing technique! I am trying out the technique and see if it works for me. I will surely accept it if it can help me come up with a working solution. –  user626607 May 22 '12 at 13:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.