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Given the following dataset

> sample
   V1       V2          V3
1   1 18.45022 62.24411694
2   2 90.34637 20.86505214
3   1 50.77358 27.30074987
4   2 52.95872 30.26189013
5   1 61.36935 26.90993530
6   2 49.31730 70.60387016
7   1 43.64142 87.64433517
8   2 36.19730 83.47232907
9   1 91.51753  0.03056485
10  2 94.79782 32.96316309
11  1 88.35368 90.69031056
12  2 46.87303 44.61570259
13  1 72.05342 20.10511681
14  2 63.25318 38.13839501
15  1 31.55472 93.25444198
16  2 40.84751 80.34973493
17  1 43.20484 17.42074279
18  2 44.99052 81.29562431
19  1 77.61112 63.93042825
20  2 55.64764 44.65648809

I can apply the sum() function to every column in every subset of rows with an equal V1 value like this:

> aggregate(sample,by=sample["V1"],FUN=sum)
  V1 V1       V2       V3
1  1 10 578.5299 489.5307
2  2 20 575.2294 527.2222

The sum() function is called 6 times, 3 times for each column and that twice as there are two subsets of rows. How can I apply a different function to each column, i.e. aggregate V2 with the mean() function and V2 with the sum() function, without calling aggregate() multiple times?

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that's not aggregation –  mdsumner May 22 '12 at 13:14
    
@mdsumner any other function with any other beautiful name is appreciated as well of course –  barbaz May 22 '12 at 13:15
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3 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

For that task, I will use ddply in plyr

> library(plyr)
> ddply(sample, .(V1), summarize, V2 = sum(V2), V3 = mean(V3))
  V1       V2       V3
1  1 578.5299 48.95307
2  2 575.2294 52.72222
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I really like plyr's simplicity. Started using it after I learned about this package here on stackoverflow. –  Alex May 22 '12 at 13:36
    
That's nice! Whats the magic with the "summarize" argument here? EDIT: got that, thats the actual function applied with additional arguments passed later on. –  barbaz May 22 '12 at 13:45
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...Or the function data.table in the package of the same name:

library(data.table)

myDT <- data.table(sample) # As mdsumner suggested, this is not a great name

myDT[, list(sumV2 = sum(V2), meanV3 = mean(V3)), by = V1]

#      V1    sumV2   meanV3
# [1,]  1 578.5299 48.95307
# [2,]  2 575.2294 52.72222
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Let's call the dataframe x rather than sample which is already taken.

EDIT:

The by function provides a more direct route than split/apply/combine

by(x, list(x$V1), f)

:EDIT

lapply(split(x, x$V1), myfunkyfunctionthatdoesadifferentthingforeachcolumn)

Of course, that's not a separate function for each column but one can do both jobs.

myfunkyfunctionthatdoesadifferentthingforeachcolumn = function(x) c(sum(x$V2), mean(x$V3))

Convenient ways to collate the result are possible such as this (but check out plyr package for a comprehensive solution, consider this motivation to learn something better).

 matrix(unlist(lapply(split(x, x$V1), myfunkyfunctionthatdoesadifferentthingforeachcolumn)), ncol = 2, byrow = TRUE, dimnames = list(unique(x$V1), c("sum", "mean")))
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Nice to know! I do prefer to get around that extra work of implementing the intermediate function though, thus the package that kohske suggested does exactly what I was looking for :) –  barbaz May 22 '12 at 14:06
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