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I have two classes:

public class Parent
{
    public virtual long? ID { get; set; } // native
    public virtual IList<Child> Children { get; set; }
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

public class Child
{
    public virtual long ID { get; set; } // assigned
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
}

Instantiating and saving parent and child:

child = new Child() { ID = 1, Name = "SomeName" };
parent = new Parent() { Children = new List() { child } };
session.Save(parent);

Which gives me:

NHibernate.StaleStateException: Unexpected row count: 0; expected: 1.

I think the problem is with the assigned id on the child. Since it has an id, NHibernate thinks it has previously saved before which is not the case.

The generated (trimmed & renamed) SQL is:

NHibernate: select child0_.ID as child1_1_, child0_.NAME as NAME1_, child0_.PARENT_ID as COMMAND7_1_, from CHILD child0_
NHibernate: select parent0_.PARENT_ID as parent1_10_
NHibernate: select parent0_.PARENT_ID as parent1_10_, parent0_.NAME as parent2_10_ from PARENT parent0_
NHibernate: UPDATE CHILD SET PARENT_ID = @p0 WHERE CHILD_ID = @p1;@p0 = 2, @p1 = 1

Mapping files:

<class name="MyNamespace.Child" table="CHILD">
  <id name="ID" column="CHILD_ID" type="System.Int64">
    <generator class="assigned"></generator>
  </id>
  <property name="Name" column="NAME"></property>
</class>

<class name="MyNamespace.Parent" table="PARENT">
  <id name="ID" column="PARENT_ID" type="System.Int64">
    <generator class="native"></generator>
  </id>
  <property name="Name" column="NAME"></property>
  <bag name="Children">
    <key column="PARENT_ID"></key>
    <one-to-many class="MyNamespace.Child"></one-to-many>
  </bag>
</class>

While searching google, I found about version tag which may be a solution but I do not have a persistent field to use as version. In this case, how can I save (insert) a child with assigned id and its parent?

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Can you post your relation mappings? –  mxmissile Jul 1 '09 at 17:17
    
Ok, I have included them now. –  Serhat Özgel Jul 1 '09 at 17:31
    
Not sure if this will fix the problem or not related to the "assigned" id, I've never worked with them. But try setting inverse="true" on your bag property. –  mxmissile Jul 1 '09 at 17:40
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3 Answers

up vote 25 down vote accepted

When cascading from a parent to a child, NHibernate uses the SaveOrUpdate method. You are correct that NHibernate need some way to determine whether it should perform an insert or an update. It will look at three different fields for an unsaved value to determine if the entity is new.

  1. Id
  2. Version
  3. Timestamp

With an assigned Id, you will need either a Version or Timestamp field in order to indicate that the entity is new.

An alternative would be to call Save() on the children explicitly.

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3  
+1 g! This helped me find a resolution to a problem with Fluent NHibernate. My Child entities were calling update instead of insert. To fix, I had to add to the mapped Id, e.g. Id(x => x.Id).UnsavedValue(*defaultValue*); Where *defaultValue* matches the value in my object, e.g. int: -1, Guid: Guid.Empty –  Jim Schubert May 7 '10 at 13:36
    
+1 for the most compact explanation how nhibernate determines if an entity is new or detached on the web. –  Moritz Both Mar 10 '11 at 14:22
    
I'm having a similar problem but not parent-child. It's just a single entity with assigned Id's (int) which I need to insert. I don't have Version and Timestamp columns but I figure I don't need those for my case. When I try to insert the entity (simply calling the Save() method), I get the same StaleStateException. NHProf shows that an UPDATE statement is sent (obviously wrong). Any ideas what I could be doing wrong and why NHibernate still tries to update? –  Koen Apr 13 '11 at 15:14
    
Got it! The id cannot be set (has to be 0) when calling the Save method, so you have to use the overload with provided id. Apparently Save is not always an insert... :o( –  Koen Apr 13 '11 at 17:29
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I'm not 100% sure if this is the same problem you are having, but my database is 100% assigned id (ugh) and I had to create an Interceptor that kept track of whether a child is or isn't persisted for cascades to work.

The code is cut/paste (which is why it has dumb names... I didn't understand 100% at first!), and I initially got 90% of it from online documentation (which I can't find via google right now ... sorry):

Base class you put on object that has an assigned ID you want to cascade:

public class Persistent
{
    private bool _saved = false;

    public virtual void OnSave()
    {
        _saved = true;
    }

    public virtual void OnLoad()
    {
        _saved = true;
    }

    public virtual bool IsSaved
    {
        get { return _saved; }
    }
}

The interceptor you add to session:

public class TrackingNumberInterceptor : EmptyInterceptor
{
    public override bool? IsTransient(object entity)
    {
        if (entity is Persistent)
        {
            return !((Persistent)entity).IsSaved;
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }

    public override bool OnLoad(object entity, object id, object[] state, string[] propertyNames, IType[] types)
    {
        if (entity is Persistent) ((Persistent)entity).OnLoad();
        return false;
    }

    public override bool OnSave(object entity, object id, object[] state, string[] propertyNames, IType[] types)
    {
        if (entity is Persistent) ((Persistent)entity).OnSave();
        return false;
    }
}

Basically the idea is that since NHibernate doesn't know if an assigned id entity is persisted or not, you keep track for it.

By default the object starts with persisted (_saved) at false. When the entity is either loaded or saved by NHibernate, the trigger sets the objects persisted (_saved) flag to true.

So for a fresh item that isn't persisted, it starts at false and stays false because NHibernate has never saved or loaded it. When NHibernate checks whether the child is transient, the trigger responds that it is transient, and a save happens which marks the child as persisted. Also now any future use will require a load which again marks it as persisted.

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This particular method has solved a lot of issues for us. FYI - the documentation where this code is found comes straight from the NHibernate docs. –  Doug Feb 3 '10 at 16:27
    
that fixed my issue as well. Very straightforward and easy to apply. –  abx78 May 1 '13 at 1:36
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Calling session.SaveOrUpdate( childObject ) should solve the problem.

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