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If I have a class that implements java.lang.Runnable, there is technically nothing stopping multiple threads from calling run concurrently on the same instance of the Runnable. Example:

Runnable r = new MyRunnable();

//start thread 1
new Thread(r).start();

//start thread 2
new Thread(r).start();

This is not really a problem if the run method is entirely "self-contained" (i.e. doesn't rely on any private instance members), because there are no variables shared between threads, so your Runnable can never get a "corrupted" internal state. But I think in most cases, your Runnable will have some private instance members that it manipulates in run, so what to do?

To use an example, my MyRunnable class has a private mode field. The primary purpose is to cleanly stop the run method (by setting mode to STOPPED), but it has other uses as well.

public static class MyRunnable implements Runnable
{
    enum Mode { RUNNING, PAUSED, STOPPED, FASTFORWARDING, REWINDING; }

    private volatile Mode mode;

    @Override
    public void run() 
    {
        mode = Mode.RUNNING;
        while (mode != Mode.STOPPED)
        {
            //do stuff. possibly other changes to the mode.
        }
    }

    public void setMode(Mode mode)
    {
        this.mode = mode;
    }

    public Mode getMode()
    {
        return mode;
    }
}

As you can see, if I execute multiple threads concurrently for the same instance ofMyRunnable (like shown earlier), any change to the mode could affect concurrently running threads in different ways. For example, if a thread sets the mode to STOPPED, another thread might change the mode to something else before every other thread even gets to see that it was set to STOPPED. This could easily prevent threads from exiting the while loop.

So how do I design a Runnable to be "concurrently usable"? Is it even possible? Is it not worth it? Is there something like C#'s ThreadStatic attribute I can use (which I think would be perfect in this context)?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It is much more common to construct multiple instances of your MyRunnable in this scenario as opposed to protecting them against multiple use:

//start thread 1
new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start();
//start thread 2
new Thread(new MyRunnable()).start();

The whole purpose of having multiple threads working is to achieve good parallel computing. If the threads need to lock common resources (like work queues, etc.) then fine but writing your Runnables to make them "concurrently usable" should not be done as a matter of course -- there should be good reasons to do so.

Is it even possible?

Certainly it is possible. Threads share resources all of the time between them. However in your case with the Mode mode variable, this should be done with multiple instances of your Runnable class.

If multiple threads are calling common code, one pattern you might consider is using ThreadLocal to store per-thread information. But storing fields inside of multiple instances of your MyRunnable will be more efficient than having one MyRunnable instance with the mode stored in a ThreadLocal.

Is it not worth it?

It is certainly not worth it if this is done on principle. Again, the whole point of forking the threads is to have them be as separate as possible from other threads to utilize multiple processores.

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The same way you design any other method or class to be threadsafe. There is nothing inherently different with a Runnable.

The C# ThreadStatic is the equivalent of a ThreadLocalVariable, but whether that is the appropriate solution here is anyones guess since there is no way for us to know what behaviour you want you class to follow.

If you want to effectively have each thread run have an independent execution of your Runnable (with regards to state) it would make more sense (and be much simpler) to have different instances.

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In general, it isn't worth it.

The cost of creating a new instance of your Runnable can't be too high anyway. If it is, you have to look at how to factor out the parts that are expensive to initialise and make sure they are thread-safe.

You can of course also use ThreadLocal variables, which on the whole are incredibly useful but probably not in this scenario.

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Well, I can't say I have a lot of experience with MP in Java so I won't try to speak to common usage, but after reading the Runnable and Thread docs, it sounds like Runnable is intended to be exactly what the name implies: a runnable object. Specifically, the docs mention using Runnable in cases where you do not wish to implement Thread, but desire a similar concept. I actually think that makes Runnable ideal for classes which encapsulate parallel or concurrent algorithms. Certainly, there is nothing to imply that you should not or can not specifically design Runnable for concurrency. Of course, that in itself (depending on the task) is much more than a single SO question could address.

Edit: I should clarify, I mentioned encapsulating parallel or concurrent algorithms within a Runnable, but I meant to convey that it might also make sense to encapsulate a task within the Runnable, and then let the caller determine whether to allocate parallel resources to that task by invoking it in concurrent threads, for instance. My point is just that, as the docs imply, if you can imagine an object being run (in any context) then Runnable may be a good bet!

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I think the OP's question is in certain scenarios when the Runnable is resource heavy, is there a way to avoid recreating these Runnables?

My experience is that you could always create lightweight Runnables to refer to heavy weight resources (such as huge arrays, etc.). Avoid calling the same Runnables on multiple threads, but create a different Runnable for each Thread is a better practice in my opinion.

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