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I want to convert a hex string to a 32 bit signed integer in C++.

So, for example, I have the hex string "fffefffe". The binary representation of this is 11111111111111101111111111111110. The signed integer representation of this is: -65538.

How do I do this conversion in C++? This also needs to work for non-negative numbers. For example, the hex string "0000000A", which is 00000000000000000000000000001010 in binary, and 10 in decimal.

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Note. You will only get -65538 for systems where sizeof(int) == 4 –  Loki Astari Jul 1 '09 at 18:39
1  
@Martin York, He didn't mention int. "32 bit signed integer" could be int32_t or __int32 etc. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 1 '09 at 18:47

8 Answers 8

up vote 98 down vote accepted

use std::stringstream

unsigned int x;   
std::stringstream ss;
ss << std::hex << "fffefffe";
ss >> x;

the following example produces -65538 as its result:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    unsigned int x;   
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << std::hex << "fffefffe";
    ss >> x;
    // output it as a signed type
    std::cout << static_cast<int>(x) << std::endl;
}

EDIT: C++11 update. In the new standard, there are a few new utility functions which you can make use of! specifically, there is a family of "string to number" functions (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/stol and http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/stoul). These are essentially thin wrappers around C's string to number conversion functions, but know how to deal with a std::string

So, the simplest answer for newer code would probably look like this:

std::string s = "0xfffefffe";
unsigned int x = std::stoul(s, nullptr, 16);

NOTE: Below is my original answer, which as the edit says is not a complete answer. For a functional solution. Stick the code above the line :-).


EDIT: It appears that since lexical_cast<> is defined to have stream conversion semantics. Sadly, streams don't understand the "0x" notation. So both the boost::lexical_cast and my hand rolled one don't deal well with hex strings. The above solution which manually sets the input stream to hex will handle it just fine.

Boost has some stuff to do this as well, which has some nice error checking capabilities as well. You can use it like this:

try {
    unsigned int x = lexical_cast<int>("0x0badc0de");
} catch(bad_lexical_cast &) {
    // whatever you want to do...
}

If you don't feel like using boost, here's a light version of lexical cast which does no error checking:

template<typename T2, typename T1>
inline T2 lexical_cast(const T1 &in) {
    T2 out;
    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << in;
    ss >> out;
    return out;
}

which you can use like this:

// though this needs the 0x prefix so it knows it is hex
unsigned int x = lexical_cast<unsigned int>("0xdeadbeef"); 
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1  
When I use that method, I end up with an integer value of 152144602 –  Clayton Jul 1 '09 at 18:03
2  
Remove unsigned, and it should work as advertised. –  jmanning2k Jul 1 '09 at 18:08
    
@jmanning2k, yea, it's weird that both boost and my lexical_cast barf on hex strings (even with the 0x prefix) if i don't put std::hex in the string. –  Evan Teran Jul 1 '09 at 18:11
    
For the stringstream example, wouldn't it be appropriate to check the streams failbit and/or badbit? –  Torleif Jan 7 '10 at 13:35
1  
@SteveWilkinson: Read the paragraph starting with the "EDIT". It explains how you need to use std::hex –  Evan Teran Jan 4 '12 at 14:58

For a method that works with both C and C++, you might want to consider using the standard library function strtol().

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
    string s = "abcd";
    char * p;
    long n = strtol( s.c_str(), & p, 16 );
    if ( * p != 0 ) { //my bad edit was here
        cout << "not a number" << endl;
    }
    else {
        cout << n << endl;
    }
}
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I don't often equire the reason for downvotes, but in this case I will - what's wrong with the above code? –  anon Jul 1 '09 at 18:15
1  
I see nothing wrong with this code either. +1 to bring balance to world :-P. –  Evan Teran Jul 1 '09 at 18:17
    
You should use strtoul not strtol. There will be + overflow when using strtol. With strtoul there will be no overflow and returned value will be converted to long to produce correct result (-65538). So your answer almost right :) –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 1 '09 at 18:36
3  
+1. Because strtol (or strtoul) faster than using stringstream. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Jul 1 '09 at 18:43
    
I'd be interested if you expanded on your remarks on overflow (something I always have a problem understanding), possibly in a separate answer? –  anon Jul 1 '09 at 19:09

Andy Buchanan, as far as sticking to C++ goes, I liked yours, but I have a few mods:

template <typename ElemT>
struct HexTo {
    ElemT value;
    operator ElemT() const {return value;}
    friend std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, HexTo& out) {
        in >> std::hex >> out.value;
        return in;
    }
};

Used like

uint32_t value = boost::lexical_cast<HexTo<uint32_t> >("0x2a");

That way you don't need one impl per int type.

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1  
I would have taken that step too, but I find that I like to limit the proliferation of angle brackets. For this case I felt breaking the "don't duplicate code" rule was justified. :-) –  Andy J Buchanan Jul 15 '10 at 7:30
    
Unfortunate that it's necessary, but nicely done. Added to my personal STL/Boost extensions/fixes header. Thanks! –  Tim Sylvester Oct 5 '11 at 0:44
    
Unfortunately this only works for unsigned conversion. So you can not convert 0xFFFFFFFF to -1. –  fmuecke Feb 29 '12 at 7:44
    
@fmuecke: That's because 0xFFFFFFFF is a signed integer overflow, which is undefined behavior. –  Billy ONeal Mar 13 '12 at 16:33
    
Very nice illustration. –  Hussain Pithawala Jan 30 at 15:12

Working example with strtoul will be:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() { 
    string s = "fffefffe";
    char * p;
    long n = strtoul( s.c_str(), & p, 16 ); 
    if ( * p != 0 ) {  
    	cout << "not a number" << endl;
    }    else {  
    	cout << n << endl;
    }
}

strtol converts string to long. On my computer numeric_limits<long>::max() gives 0x7fffffff. Obviously that 0xfffefffe is greater than 0x7fffffff. So strtol returns MAX_LONG instead of wanted value. strtoul converts string to unsigned long that's why no overflow in this case.

Ok, strtol is considering input string not as 32-bit signed integer before convertation. Funny sample with strtol:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() { 
    string s = "-0x10002";
    char * p;
    long n = strtol( s.c_str(), & p, 16 ); 
    if ( * p != 0 ) {  
    	cout << "not a number" << endl;
    }    else {  
    	cout << n << endl;
    }
}

The code above prints -65538 in console.

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Here's a simple and working method I found elsewhere:

string hexString = "7FF";
int hexNumber;
sscanf(hexString.c_str(), "%x", &hexNumber);

Please note that you might prefer using unsigned long integer/long integer, to receive the value. Another note, the c_str() function just converts the std::string to const char* .

So if you have a const char* ready, just go ahead with using that variable name directly, as shown below [I am also showing the usage of the unsigned long variable for a larger hex number. Do not confuse it with the case of having const char* instead of string]:

const char *hexString = "7FFEA5"; //Just to show the conversion of a bigger hex number
unsigned long hexNumber; //In case your hex number is going to be sufficiently big.
sscanf(hexString, "%x", &hexNumber);

This works just perfectly fine (provided you use appropriate data types per your need).

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I had the same problem today, here's how I solved it so I could keep lexical_cast<>

typedef unsigned int    uint32;
typedef signed int      int32;

class uint32_from_hex   // For use with boost::lexical_cast
{
    uint32 value;
public:
    operator uint32() const { return value; }
    friend std::istream& operator>>( std::istream& in, uint32_from_hex& outValue )
    {
        in >> std::hex >> outValue.value;
    }
};

class int32_from_hex   // For use with boost::lexical_cast
{
    uint32 value;
public:
    operator int32() const { return static_cast<int32>( value ); }
    friend std::istream& operator>>( std::istream& in, int32_from_hex& outValue )
    {
        in >> std::hex >> outvalue.value;
    }
};

uint32 material0 = lexical_cast<uint32_from_hex>( "0x4ad" );
uint32 material1 = lexical_cast<uint32_from_hex>( "4ad" );
uint32 material2 = lexical_cast<uint32>( "1197" );

int32 materialX = lexical_cast<int32_from_hex>( "0xfffefffe" );
int32 materialY = lexical_cast<int32_from_hex>( "fffefffe" );
// etc...

(Found this page when I was looking for a less sucky way :-)

Cheers, A.

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1  
Code has trivial compilation error - outvalue is not defined (should be outValue). –  Gabi Davar Nov 30 '11 at 13:36
    
Thanks Gabi. Fixed the silly typo! –  Andy J Buchanan Jun 26 '13 at 15:02

This worked for me:

string string_test = "80123456";
unsigned long x;
signed long val;

std::stringstream ss;
ss << std::hex << string_test;
ss >> x;
// ss >> val;  // if I try this val = 0
val = (signed long)x;  // However, if I cast the unsigned result I get val = 0x80123456 
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another method

using namespace System;

template <typename NUM>
NUM hexstr2num(String^ h)
{
    NUM v=0;
    String^ k=L"0123456789ABCDEF";
    short l=h->Length;
    char off;
    h=h->ToUpper();

    if(h->Substring(0,1)!=L"H")
        {if(h->Substring(0,2)==L"0X") off=2;}
    else
        {off=1;}

    if(!off) throw;

    char dx=0;
    for(int i=l;i>off;i--)
        {
            if((dx=k->IndexOf(h->Substring(i-1,1)))>=0)
                {v+=dx<<((l-i)<<2);}
            else
                {throw;}
        }
    return v;
}
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