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Delegate : I understand. But when I move to event, many things I don't understand so much. I read book, MSDN and some simple examples on Network, they both have same structures. For example, here is the link : Event Example

I take the first example, that the author said it's the most easiest example about C# Event.

Here is his code :

public class Metronome
{
    public event TickHandler Tick;
    public EventArgs e = null;
    public delegate void TickHandler(Metronome m, EventArgs e);
    public void Start()
    {
        while (true)
        {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(3000);
            if (Tick != null)
            {
                Tick(this, e);
            }
        }
    }
}

public class Listener
{
    public void Subscribe(Metronome m)
    {
        m.Tick += new Metronome.TickHandler(HeardIt);
    }
    private void HeardIt(Metronome m, EventArgs e)
    {
        System.Console.WriteLine("HEARD IT");
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        Metronome m = new Metronome();
        Listener l = new Listener();
        l.Subscribe(m);
        m.Start();
    }
}

You can notice line: public event TickHandler Tick. When I change to public TickHandler Tick, program still run the same. But new line I understand because it's just a pure delegate.

So, my question is : what is the real purpose of event keyword in line : public event TickHandler Tick. This is very important, because all examples always use like this, but I cannot explain why.

Thanks :)

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7 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Delegates and events are related concepts, but they are not the same thing. The term "delegate" tends to have two meanings (often glossed over):

  • A delegate type which is similar to a single method interface. (There are significant differences, but that's a reasonable starting point.)
  • An instance of that type, often created via a method group, such that when the delegate is "invoked", the method is called.

An event is neither of those. It's a kind of member in a type - a pair of add/remove methods, taking a delegate to subscribe to or unsubscribe from the event. The add and remove methods are used when you use foo.SomeEvent += handler; or foo.SomeEvent -= handler;.

This is very similar to how a property is really a pair of get/set methods (or possibly just one of the two).

When you declare a field-like event like this:

public event TickHandler Tick;

the compiler adds members to your class which are somewhat like this:

private TickHandler tick;

public event TickHandler
{
    add { tick += value; }
    remove { tick -= value; }
}

It's a bit more complicated than that, but that's the basic idea - it's a simple implementation of the event, just like an automatically implemented property. From inside the class, you can access the backing field, whereas outside the class you'll always end up just using the event.

Personally I think it's a pity that the declaration of a field-like event looks so much like a field of a delegate type - it leads to some of the misleading (IMO) statements found in some of the answers, as if the event keyword "modifies" a field declaration - when actually it means you're declaring something entirely different. I think it would have been clearer if field-like events looked more like automatically-implemented properties, e.g.

// Not real C#, but I wish it were...
public event TickHandler Tick { add; remove; }

I have a whole article going into rather more detail, which you may find useful.

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The event keyword basically restricts the operation on your delegate. You can no longer assign it manually using the = operator.

You can only add (using +=) or remove (using -=) delegates from your event, one by one. This is done in order to prevent some subscriber to "overwrite" other subscriptions.

Consequently, you cannot do: m.Tick = new Metronome.TickHandler(HeardIt)

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2  
Note that these restrictions are only outside of the type where the event is declared. Inside, you can still do whatever you want, so that you can do things like Tick(this, e). You can think of it as transparently making a private TickHandler along with public add/remove methods that are accessed via += and -=. –  Tim S. May 22 '12 at 17:03
2  
I think it's misleading to say it "restricts the operation" - it fundamentally declares a different kind of member (an event). I think it helps to mentally separate events and delegates quite significantly. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 17:41
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"event" is a modifier. What's the benefit?

  1. you can use events in interfaces
  2. only the class declaring it can invoke an event
  3. events expose an add and remove accessor that you can override and do custom stuff
  4. events limit you to a specific signature of the assigned method SomeMethod(object source, EventArgs args) which provide you with additional information about the event.
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1  
I wouldn't say it's a modifier. It's a keyword, but it's there to introduce a different type of member - an event. At that point, it's an event declaration, not a field declaration. A field-like event declaration does introduce a field, but that's an implementation detail. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 17:40
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You're correct - the addition of the event keyword seems to be almost redundant. However, there's a key difference between fields that are events and fields that are typed to a pure delegate. Using the event keyword means that objects external to the containing object can subscribe to the delegate, but they cannot invoke it. When you drop the event keyword, external objects can subscribe AND invoke the delegate (visibility permitting.)

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When you add a listener to your program you add the event, not the delegate

see your code m.Tick +=

you see that part right there is you are asking for the property (type event) and you are adding to it a listener with the +=. Now you can only add to that Tick property a TickHandler type and if you override it you have to make your own that is the same format as TickHandler.

much like when you add to a string, or int.

string stringTest = string.Empty;
stringTest += "this works";
stringTest += 4; //this doesn't though
int intTest = 0;
intTest += 1; //works because the type is the same
intTest += "This doesn't work";
Metronome m = new Metronome();
Metronome.TickHandler myTicker = new Metronome.TickHandler(function);
m.Tick += myTicker; //works because it is the right type
m.Tick += 4; //doesn't work... wrong type
m.Tick += "This doesnt work either"; //string type is not TickHandler type

does that clear it up some?

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You just tell me about Delegate is type safe. But don't tell me difference between delegate and event. Can you tell me more ? –  hqt May 22 '12 at 17:19
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As far as i'm informed an event is basically a multicast delegate, but with different access rules for the basic operations, that can be performed on delegates and events from within or outside the class they are defined in.

The operations are:

assign using the = operator

add/remove using the += and -= operator

invoke using the () operator

              Operation         | delegate   | event
              ------------------+------------+--------
Inside class  += / -=           | valid      | valid
              ------------------+------------+--------
Inside class  =                 | valid      | valid
              ------------------+------------+--------
Inside class  ()                | valid      | valid
              ------------------+------------+--------
Outside class  += / -=          | valid      | valid
              ------------------+------------+--------
Outside class  =                | valid      | not valid
              ------------------+------------+--------
Outside class  ()               | valid      | not valid

This gives you encapsulation which is always good OOP style. :-)

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No, an event is not a multicast delegate, any more than a property is a field. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 17:32
1  
@JonSkeet: MSDN (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8627sbea(v=vs.100).aspx) says: Events are a special kind of multicast delegate that can only be invoked from within the class or struct where they are declared (the publisher class). For someone who's deep into c#, thats quite shallow! –  Mithrandir May 22 '12 at 17:46
    
MSDN is simply wrong here. (It's not the first time.) An event is not a kind of delegate. It's a member type which allows delegates to be subscribed or removed. (The implementation of the event is up to the class.) Do you think a string property is the same as a string? It's a similar situation. It's a shame that MSDN is wrong here, but there's no need to propagate it... The C# specification (section 10.8 of the C# 4 spec) starts off rather more accurately - I suggest you read that. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 17:56
    
@JonSkeet: ah, the high and the mighty. The comparison between the string field and string property and this case is, well, not quite applicable, but have it your way! –  Mithrandir May 22 '12 at 17:59
2  
Except it's misleading (and vague), IMO - it's really not hard to grasp the difference between events and delegates, but few people seem to bother to try. So when I correct you when you're inaccurate, why not take the time to learn a bit more? It's like the difference between the myth of "objects are passed by reference by default" and the reality of references being passed by value - it takes a bit longer to explain the more correct model, but everything makes more sense afterwards. –  Jon Skeet May 22 '12 at 18:13
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I think the main difference between using delegate and event is that the event can be only raised by the Server (means the author of the class)

If you remove the event keyword now you can raise the m.Tick(sender,e) in the Listener otherwise not.

public class Listener
{
  public void Subscribe(Metronome m)
  {
    m.Tick += new Metronome.TickHandler(HeardIt);
  }

  private void RaisTick(object sender, EventArgs e)
  {
      m.Tick(sender,e);
  }
  private void HeardIt(Metronome m, EventArgs e)
  {
     System.Console.WriteLine("HEARD IT");
  }

}

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