Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a structure in memory, but not all members are known yet (this struct is reverse engineered). What I want to do is have the representation in memory like:

struct Name {
    long Id;
    byte unknown[32];
    float X;
};

But I want the byte unknown[32] to be invisible, so when I am using something of type Name I can only see the 2 variables Id and X. I think it's similar to:

struct Name {
    long Id;
    byte : 32*8; // So this doesn't appear
    float X;
};

But this doesn't work 1. because I am then limited to 8 bytes per line so it would have to look like:

struct Name {
    long Id;
    long long : 64;
    long long : 64;
    long long : 64;
    long long : 64;
    float X;
};

And secondly, when I actually try to do this, it doesn't work as expected (accessing X doesn't refer to offset 0x24 of the struct).

share|improve this question
4  
Why can't you use the first form and make unknown private? –  Steve Townsend May 22 '12 at 17:02
    
The answer is likely going to be compiler-specific. What compiler do you use? –  Robᵩ May 22 '12 at 17:06
6  
@Steve: pedantically speaking, the layout of data members with different access specifiers is unspecified (C++03 9.2 and 11.1). I'd just live with public names that are obviously intended to not be used. –  Michael Burr May 22 '12 at 17:31
1  
The last approach doesn't work because alignment of long long is not the same as char. –  Gene Bushuyev May 22 '12 at 17:33
1  
I would have just gone with it being named, but as a template class you can't do anything with: ideone.com/o8JQm –  Mooing Duck May 22 '12 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

You are on the right track, but you just have the details wrong. The compiler inserted alignment padding into your version of Name. This program might do what you want:

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

struct Name {
    long Id;  // offset 0x00
    int : 32; // offset 0x04
    long long : 64;  // 0x08
    long long : 64;  // 0x10
    long long : 64;  // 0x18
    int : 32; // offset 0x20
    float X;  // offset 0x24
};

int main () {
  assert(sizeof(int) == 4);
  assert(sizeof(long) == 4);
  assert(sizeof(float) == 4);
  assert(sizeof(long long) == 8);
  assert(offsetof(Name, Id) == 0);
  assert(offsetof(Name, X) == 0x24);
}

Alternatively, you might investigate #pragma pack.

Note: There is no portable, standard-sanctioned solution to your problem. Compilers are free to insert padding bytes (almost) wherever and however they choose. But there may be non-portable, compiler-sanctioned solutions, such as the two above.

share|improve this answer

If you're looking for a generic solution for any unknown structure, have a look at this code

template <size_t SIZE> class UnknownStruct
{
public:
    enum {size = SIZE};
    explicit UnknownStruct(unsigned char* data)
    {
        memcpy(m_data, data, SIZE);
    }
    template <size_t OFFSET, typename TYPE> TYPE* read()
    {
        if(OFFSET + sizeof(TYPE) <= SIZE)
            return reinterpret_cast<TYPE*>(m_data + OFFSET);
        return NULL;
    }
private:
    unsigned char m_data[SIZE];
};

UnknownStructure is a blob of raw bytes (of count SIZE) you can access with the read function. Here's an example of how to use it for your issue

class Name : public UnknownStruct<sizeof(long) + 32 + sizeof(float)>
{
public:
    explicit Name(unsigned char* data) : UnknownStruct<size>(data){}
    long& ID()
    {
        return *read<0, long>();
    }
    float& X()
    {
        return *read<sizeof(long) + 32, float>();
    }
};

the calling code would look something like this

unsigned char foodata[100] = {0};
Name fooreader(foodata);
fooreader.ID() = 57;
long id = fooreader.ID();

as you discover more about the structure, you can add more functions to the Name class that will read types from appropriate offsets

The advantage of this code is it can be used for any unknown structure. There may be other libraries out there that provide this solution but this is short and simple enough to use

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.