Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This seems like it should be something I already know. We need to run a bunch of sql updates in a transaction, and rollback if one of them fails. We also want to print a status message since we'll be running a large number of these. This would be simple if I were doing it in a general purpose programming language. But I am trying to find a solution a team member can use that is just SQL. She has done this in MS SQL Server in the past with the pattern below. Is there an equivalently simple pattern for Oracle?

DECLARE @ErrorVar INT;
BEGIN TRANSACTION;
UPDATE MyTable1 SET MyColumn1 = 'JSMITH' where MyColumn1 = 'JOHN';
SET @ErrorVar = @@ERROR;
UPDATE MyTable2 SET MyColumn2 = 'JSMITH' where MyColumn2 = 'JOHN';
SET @ErrorVar = @ErrorVar + @@ERROR;
UPDATE MyTable SET LoginID = 'JSMITH' where LoginID = 'JOHN';
SET @ErrorVar = @ErrorVar + @@ERROR;

IF @ErrorVar <> 0
   BEGIN
   ROLLBACK TRANSACTION;
   PRINT 'We had a problem with JSMITH and rolled back *****';
   END;
ELSE
   BEGIN
   COMMIT TRANSACTION;
   PRINT 'JSMITH Updated ok';
   END;
GO
share|improve this question
    
are you looking for a way to do this in a stored procedure? –  northpole Jul 1 '09 at 18:54
    
ideally this would be a bunch of sql statements in a txt file that she can run in sqlplus. That's how the SQL server version works. –  Peter Recore Jul 1 '09 at 19:09

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In SQLPlus, use the WHENEVER command to control behavior when an error occurs.

WHENEVER SQLERROR EXIT FAILURE ROLLBACK is fairly standard in our scripts.

Type HELP WHENEVER at the SQLPlus prompt for more info.

share|improve this answer

Because my answer to akf's comment is too long for a comment, I post it as a separate answer.

Here is why it doesn't achieve anything extra/useful.

Suppose we have the three tables mentioned by Peter:

SQL> create table mytable1 (mycolumn1) as select cast('JOHN' as varchar2(6)) from dual
  2  /

Tabel is aangemaakt.

SQL> create table mytable2 (mycolumn2) as select cast('JOHN' as varchar2(6)) from dual
  2  /

Tabel is aangemaakt.

SQL> create table mytable (loginid) as select cast('JOHN' as varchar2(6)) from dual
  2  /

Tabel is aangemaakt.

And add a check constraint to make the third update statement fail:

SQL> alter table mytable add constraint no_jsmith_ck1 check (loginid <> 'JSMITH')
  2  /

Tabel is gewijzigd.

The PL/SQL block can be as simple as this, and it fails:

SQL> begin
  2    update mytable1
  3       set mycolumn1 = 'JSMITH'
  4     where mycolumn1 = 'JOHN'
  5    ;
  6    update mytable2
  7       set mycolumn2 = 'JSMITH'
  8     where mycolumn2 = 'JOHN'
  9    ;
 10    update mytable
 11       set loginid = 'JSMITH'
 12     where loginid = 'JOHN'
 13    ;
 14    commit
 15    ;
 16  end;
 17  /
begin
*
FOUT in regel 1:
.ORA-02290: check constraint (RWK.NO_JSMITH_CK1) violated
ORA-06512: at line 10

And to show that everything was rollbacked, without issuing a rollback:

SQL> select * from mytable1
  2  /

MYCOLU
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

SQL> select * from mytable2
  2  /

MYCOLU
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

SQL> select * from mytable
  2  /

LOGINI
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

So no exception handler is necessary here. Your proposed exception handler does this:

SQL> begin
  2    update mytable1
  3       set mycolumn1 = 'JSMITH'
  4     where mycolumn1 = 'JOHN'
  5    ;
  6    update mytable2
  7       set mycolumn2 = 'JSMITH'
  8     where mycolumn2 = 'JOHN'
  9    ;
 10    update mytable
 11       set loginid = 'JSMITH'
 12     where loginid = 'JOHN'
 13    ;
 14    commit
 15    ;
 16  EXCEPTION
 17  WHEN OTHERS THEN
 18    ROLLBACK;  --// Oracle will do this for you, but it doesnt hurt to be clear
 19    DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line (DBMS_UTILITY.format_error_backtrace);
 20    raise_application_error(-20001,'An error was encountered - '||SQLCODE||' -ERROR-     '||SQLERRM);
 21  END;
 22  /
ORA-06512: at line 10

begin
*
FOUT in regel 1:
.ORA-20001: An error was encountered - -2290 -ERROR-     ORA-02290: check constraint (RWK.NO_JSMITH_CK1) violated
ORA-06512: at line 20

Although it's not wrong, I see nothing of added value here.

SQL> select * from mytable1
  2  /

MYCOLU
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

SQL> select * from mytable2
  2  /

MYCOLU
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

SQL> select * from mytable
  2  /

LOGINI
------
JOHN

1 rij is geselecteerd.

And why advice to add code that does nothing?

Regards, Rob.

share|improve this answer
    
got it. thanks for taking the time for the detailed response. i guess the point i was trying to make was that you could catch the exception and customize your error, add data from procedure fields, etc. (granted, not shown in my example), which the built-in handling doesnt do for you. –  akf Jul 2 '09 at 17:15

you can add an EXCEPTION block at the end of your procedure:

EXCEPTION
WHEN OTHERS THEN
  ROLLBACK;  --// Oracle will do this for you, but it doesnt hurt to be clear
  DBMS_OUTPUT.put_line (DBMS_UTILITY.format_error_backtrace);
  raise_application_error(-20001,'An error was encountered - '||SQLCODE||' -ERROR-     '||SQLERRM);
END;

edit: i added a call to output a backtrace to provide linenumbers in the error reporting. (this is for 10g or better)

share|improve this answer
    
-1 Because this achieves nothing but hiding the line number of the error message. –  Rob van Wijk Jul 2 '09 at 8:47
    
@Rob van Wijk: i would argue that this does what the question was asking, which was to provide a way to identify an error condition and generate a message as a result. i agree that is hid the line number. i have added that in now. –  akf Jul 2 '09 at 10:57
    
@akf: I added a separate answer to answer your comment. –  Rob van Wijk Jul 2 '09 at 12:13

A simple SQL Script might look this way:

set serveroutput on
DECLARE
BEGIN
  dbms_output.enable(100000);  -- overrides default 10000 byte limit
  UPDATE MyTable1 SET MyColumn1 = 'JSMITH' where MyColumn1 = 'JOHN';
  UPDATE MyTable2 SET MyColumn2 = 'JSMITH' where MyColumn2 = 'JOHN';
  UPDATE MyTable SET LoginID = 'JSMITH' where LoginID = 'JOHN';
  COMMIT;
EXCEPTION
  WHEN OTHERS THEN
     ROLLBACK;
     dbms_output.put_line('Error processing JSMITH');
END;
/

This is called an anonymous procedure in Oracle. You can feed it to Oracle via sqlplus easily:

sqlplus user/pw@db @yourscript

You can get fancier with the script, of course (e.g., surround each UPDATE with BEGIN-EXCEPTION-END to identify which update had the problem) but this should get you started.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 because of the exception section. The dbms_output.put_line should be replaced by a RAISE; statement if you want to see something meaningful. And in this case it contains no additional functionality, so the exception handler can better be omitted completely. –  Rob van Wijk Jul 2 '09 at 10:40
    
So, is my answer technically incorrect? I think it's pretty poor form to down vote technically correct answers simply because you think you have a better way. Let the OP decide among the answers. My answer is pretty much an exact translation of what the OP gave us, isn't it? –  DCookie Jul 2 '09 at 14:41
    
I did like the literalness of the translation which is why I upvoted it. –  Peter Recore Jul 3 '09 at 4:46
    
DCookie: Since it is an exact translation of OP's code, the -1 here is too harsh indeed. Unfortunately I cannot remove it anymore. My apologies. I guess I'm overreacting to the constant abuse of WHEN OTHERS exception handlers... –  Rob van Wijk Jul 23 '09 at 18:33

PL/SQL has rollback and rollback to savepoint commands.

You can find documentation about it here.

share|improve this answer

If a stored procedure is your design choice (and I am not sure it is) then you might want to do something like the follwoing:

EXCEPTION
    WHEN OTHERS
    THEN
      out_status := 1;
      raise_application_error(-20001,SQLERRM);
      DBMS_OUTPUT.PUT_LINE(SQLERRM);
  END;

Return an out status from your stored proc will then allow you to respond accordingly, if all you are looking for is a pass/fail boolean.

If straight SQL is your choice then in ORACLE if you get an exception during a sql statement update it will throw the exception and not commit any changes (I'm not sure a rollback is necessary when the update is not successful due to an exception, I believe Oracle handles this).

share|improve this answer
    
straight sql in a text file to be run through sqlplus is my target. –  Peter Recore Jul 1 '09 at 19:11
1  
The raise_application_error will cause the exception block to exit before it gets to the DBMS_OUTPUT. By raising an exception, the calling block will get an exception and the out_status is irrelevant. If a statement fails with an exception, it is rolled back. If a top level PL/SQL call fails with an exception, all uncommitted changes made by that call are rolled back. –  Gary Myers Jul 1 '09 at 22:35
    
I think that is pretty obvious. I was merely giving three examples of options (hence, "if you are looking for a boolean indicator"). I think the developer would quickly realize that. I guess I should have been more clear. –  northpole Jul 1 '09 at 23:40
    
In that case, those ("out_status" and "dbms_output") are very poor options. In most cases, anything but a RAISE will be quite wrong in a "WHEN OTHERS" exception handler. –  Jeffrey Kemp Jul 2 '09 at 12:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.