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I have a table like this:

date         day     weather
2000-01-01   Monday  Sunny
2000-01-02   Tuesday Rainy

. . .

I want to get number of rainy Mondays and sunny Mondays in one query like

day     rainy_d  sunny_d
Monday  2        5

How to accomplish that in Mysql and PostgreSQL?

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3 Answers 3

select `Day`, 
SUM(case when weather = 'Sunny' THEN 1 ELSE 0 end) as Sunny_D,
SUM(case when weather = 'Rainy' THEN 1 ELSE 0 end) as Rainy_D
FROM YOURTABLENAME
Where day = 'Monday'
Group by `Day`
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works perfectly. thanks –  user1267132 May 22 '12 at 18:20

Standard SQL, works in both:

SELECT
    day,
    SUM(CASE WHEN weather = 'Rainy' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS rainy_d,
    SUM(CASE WHEN weather = 'Sunny' THEN 1 ELSE 0 END) AS sunny_d
FROM yourtable
GROUP BY day

More concise version - MySQL only:

SELECT
    day,
    SUM(weather = 'Rainy') AS rainy_d,
    SUM(weather = 'Sunny') AS sunny_d
FROM yourtable
GROUP BY day

More concise version - PostgreSQL only:

SELECT
    day,
    SUM((weather = 'Rainy')::int) AS rainy_d,
    SUM((weather = 'Sunny')::int) AS sunny_d
FROM yourtable
GROUP BY day
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The column day is probably redundant. I would delete it without substitution. The column date holds all the information. Then your query could look like this ..

In PostgreSQL:

SELECT to_char(date, 'Day') AS day
      ,COUNT(NULLIF(weather,'Sunny')) AS rainy_d
      ,COUNT(NULLIF(weather,'Rainy')) AS sunny_d
FROM   tbl
GROUP  BY 1;

In MySQL:

SELECT DAYNAME(date) AS day
... rest identical

The NULLIF() construct works for exactly two distinct (non-null) values in the column weather and is standard SQL. For more values use the alternatives provided by @Mark and @xQbert.

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