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I have a class that does something, and when it's done it returns true, but if any of the various things go wrong it will return false. Now my question is, should status messages for such events be kept inside a class (Example1) or outside the class (Example2) where class maybe only provides error code to help distinguishing what happened.

    class Example1 {

       private $var;
       private $status;

       public function doSomething($var) {
         $this->var = $var;

         if (!is_numeric($this->var)) { 
            $this->status = 'Please provide a number'; 
            return false; 
         }

         if (empty($this->var)) {
            $this->status = 'Please fill the field';
            return false;
         }

         $this->status = 'Ok, you submitted a number, cool.';
         return true;
    } 

         function getStatus() {
            return $this->status;
         }
}

example 2:

    class Example2 {

       private $var;

       public function doSomething($var) {
         $this->var = $var;

         if (!is_numeric($this->var)) {  
            return false; 
         }

         if (empty($this->var)) {
                return false;
         }

             return true;
    } 

}

Example 1 seems to me more convenient to use, code reads like a poem, but at the same time seems less reusable, depending on what you use class for, you might want success/error messages to have different syntax.

So basically my question would be what's the usual practice?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

First example: you hard code error messages which is... bad. And you can't see the error message if you don't check $object->status later.
Second example: if something goes wrong, you know it but you don't know why.

I suggest avoiding both these ways and throwing exceptions for a more object oriented approach (I guess that's what you want, since you're using classes :).

share|improve this answer
    
It depends on what the code is for. If it is validating a form server-side, for example, those error messages may need to be returned to be displayed on screen. – Caleb Taylor May 22 '12 at 17:57
    
Can you explain why hard-coding error messages like that is bad? – andrewsi May 22 '12 at 17:58
    
@CalebTaylor Yes. :) But not on the class itself. -- He should catch the exception elsewhere (in the controller for example) and then send the status code. – Samy Dindane May 22 '12 at 17:58
    
@SamyDindane Now we are getting into MVC :) But I digress. – Caleb Taylor May 22 '12 at 18:02
    
@andrewsi First thing I can think of: what if you want them translated later?! What if you simply want to change them? What if you wan't to use the class in an API and the guys on the other side want to customize the messages? -- Generally, classes are supposed to contain logic only. – Samy Dindane May 22 '12 at 18:02

It's completely up to you. If error messages are easier for you to understand and help you debug your code, then by all means go for it. Coming up with error codes for different errors will probably just slow down the development process, unless you want to hide the true errors from users (but in that case you have several options, one of which is to not print errors to screen at all if users might see them).

share|improve this answer

It's not what you are asking, but it's generally considered bad practice to have multiple return statements in one function. The problem is that it makes it harder to know where you exit the function, which makes it not clear what is executed. In your example, if the first test succeeds, the rest of the code is not executed. What would happen if you set some attributes afterwards ? Sometimes they will be set, sometimes they won't. To get rid of this problem, it's better to have only one return statement. More code will be executed, and you'll have to change the way you are coding a bit in order to get used to it.

Here is an example of what I mean, with the code you provide :

public function doSomething($var) {
     $this->var = $var;
    $result = false;
     if (!is_numeric($this->var)) { 
        $this->status = 'Please provide a number';  
     }
     else if (empty($this->var)) {
        $this->status = 'Please fill the field';
     }
     else{
        $this->status = 'Ok, you submitted a number, cool.';
        $result = true;
    }
     return $result;
} 
share|improve this answer
    
True, not the answer to question, but makes a lot of sense, thanks. My line of thinking with multiple return statements was - a function needs to do something, and if it can't why execute it further, but I can see how single return makes sense, also in making the logic easier to understand. – CodeVirtuoso May 22 '12 at 18:24

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