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I am trying to retrieve data from an XML file that is not located on my site's server, and then use that data fro various things, such as charts. Here is one example: http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat=40.78158&lon=-73.96648&FcstType=dwml. This is an XML file with the weather data for central park. I want to retrieve the data that is in the <value>tag, which is in the <pressure> tag, so I can create a graph with barometric pressure. I would prefer to do this with JavaScript, but I don't think it's possible to do so when the file isn't on my server.

Note: I do not want a different solution to retrieve the pressure data from somewhere else, because I want to retrieve other pieces of data from other XML files as well.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There's an interesting article about using Yahoo! Pipes to transform Xml weather data to JSON and use the result in a web page without need for any server side stuff (PHP, curl, etc.).

EDIT

Being new to jQuery myself, I a had to dig a little more to find out that (almost) everything described in the first article can be condensed down to

$.getJSON("<your Yahoo pipes url here>&_callback=?", function (data) {
    alert(data.value.items[0].data[0].parameters.wordedForecast.text[0]);
});

using jQuerys builtin JSONP.

Pitfall!

Beware that Yahoo expects the callback url param to be named _callback

Nice summary on Cross-domain communications with JSONP which helped a lot to come up with this answer.

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I think that's the perfect solution, however, I can't get it to work here. Can you try and figure out what went wrong? I know that the pipe is working, so it must be the JavaScript. –  Ian May 25 '12 at 13:06
    
Good news everyone! It's even easier because jQuery has all the hacky bits already built in ;-) –  Filburt May 25 '12 at 17:18

If your javascript code is on a server (as opposed to a mobile device), have PHP code load the xml, escape it and insert it into the HTML page. Then you just have to grab that in your code and process it with DOMParser.

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Sorry, I need a more detailed explanation. I have yet to learn any of the web programming languages like PHP. (next on my list :) –  Ian May 22 '12 at 19:16

You could use curl to pull the data to your server and act on it from there.

curl -o data.txt "http://forecast.weather.gov/MapClick.php?lat=40.78158&lon=-73.96648&FcstType=dwml"

This will give you the information in a file called data.txt. You could then either parse it server side and then just give the bits of data needed, or make the whole file available to your client, since they are both now in the same domain.

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That sounds good, but I've never heard of curl. How do I implement this, specifically? –  Ian May 22 '12 at 19:15
    
Again, difficult to say without knowing what your server side set up is. –  E. Maggini May 22 '12 at 20:00
    
It's a school server, so I don't have much control. I know the following about it: it doesn't support forms, it supports FTP, it supports JavaScript, and it supports CSS. –  Ian May 22 '12 at 20:05
    
My guess is you guys are using PHP on the server side and javascript is only available in the client browser. If it turns out you are using node.js let me know and I can post another solution. Otherwise take a look at this link for how to use curl from php. [link]paul-norman.co.uk/2009/06/asynchronous-curl-requests –  E. Maggini May 22 '12 at 20:38
    
So I would embed that into the HTMl, and put the script above in a php file, and then finally retrieve the information? Sorry if I seem really dumb; I have never used PHP before. thanks –  Ian May 22 '12 at 21:14

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